Quotes:Quote of the day/February

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This page lists quote of the day proposals specifically for dates in the month of February, and quotes proposed should ideally have some relation to the day, or persons born on it, though sometimes exceptions can be made, usually for notable quotes that relate to recent events, such as the death of prominent individuals. Developing ideas of people or works to quote on specific days can be explored through the Wikipedia page: List of historical anniversaries. The numeric section heading of each date is also a direct link to the Wikipedia list of births, deaths, and other events which occured on that date.

See also: February 2008

Ranking system:

4 : Excellent - should definitely be used.
3 : Very Good - strong desire to see it used.
2 : Good - some desire to see it used.
1 : Acceptable - but with no particular desire to see it used.
0 : Not acceptable - not appropriate for use as a quote of the day.

2005
There ain't no such thing as a free lunch. ~ American proverb
  • selected by Kalki
2006
I've known rivers:
I've known rivers ancient as the world and older than the
flow of human blood in human veins.
My soul has grown deep like the rivers.

~ Langston Hughes ~ (born 1 February 1902)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
I tire so of hearing people say,
Let things take their course.
Tomorrow is another day.

I do not need my freedom when I’m dead.
I cannot live on tomorrow’s bread.
~ Langston Hughes ~
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2008
Reason is the life of the law; nay, the common law itself is nothing else but reason. ~ Edward Coke
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2009

Suggestions

When you turn the corner
And you run into yourself
Then you know that you have turned
All the corners that are left.
~ Langston Hughes (born February 1, 1902)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:42, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:05, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:37, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The law is the surest sanctuary, that a man should take, and the strongest fortresse to protect the weakest of all. ~ Edward Coke (born February 1, 1552)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 06:48, 31 January 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:37, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

What happens to a dream deferred?
Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over
like a syrupy sweet?
Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.
Or does it explode?

~ Langston Hughes ~

  • 3 Kalki 02:03, 1 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:37, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Hold fast to dreams
For if dreams die
Life is a broken-winged bird
That cannot fly.

~ Langston Hughes ~

  • 3 Kalki 02:03, 1 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Zarbon 21:37, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
My years are not advancing as fast as you might think. ~ Bill Murray as "Phil" in Groundhog Day
  • selected by Kalki
2005
Anything different is good. ~ Bill Murray as "Phil" in Groundhog Day
  • selected by Kalki
2006
There is a spirit and a need and a man at the beginning of every great human advance. Every one of these must be right for that particular moment of history, or nothing happens. ~ Coretta Scott King (recent death)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
Well, it's Groundhog Day... again... ~ Bill Murray as "Phil" in Groundhog Day
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
History, Stephen said, is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake. ~ James Joyce in Ulysses
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2009

Suggestions

When the soul of a man is born in this country there are nets flung at it to hold it back from flight. You talk to me of nationality, language, religion. I shall try to fly by those nets. ~ James Joyce (born February 2, 1882)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:51, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:06, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:41, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Pity is the feeling which arrests the mind in the presence of whatsoever is grave and constant in human sufferings and unites it with the sufferer. Terror is the feeling which arrests the mind in the presence of whatsoever is grave and constant in human sufferings and unites it with the secret cause. ~ James Joyce

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:51, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 22:16, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:41, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I will tell you what I will do and what I will not do. I will not serve that in which I no longer believe, whether it call itself my home, my fatherland, or my church: and I will try to express myself in some mode of life or art as freely as I can and as wholly as I can, using for my defence the only arms I allow myself to use — silence, exile and cunning. ~ James Joyce

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:51, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 22:16, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:41, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Her image had passed into his soul for ever and no word had broken the holy silence of his ecstasy. Her eyes had called him and his soul had leaped at the call. To live, to err, to fall, to triumph, to recreate life out of life! A wild angel had appeared to him, the angel of mortal youth and beauty, an envoy from the fair courts of life, to throw open before him in an instant of ecstasy the gates of all the ways of error and glory. On and on and on and on! ~ James Joyce

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:51, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 22:16, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:41, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Art has arrived at the paradox that tradition itself requires the occurrence of radical attacks on tradition. ~ Harold Rosenberg (born February 2, 1906)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:51, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 22:16, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:41, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Both art and the artist lack identity and define themselves only through their encounter with each other. ~ Harold Rosenberg

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:51, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 22:16, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:41, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The artist is obliged to invent the self who will paint his pictures. ~ Harold Rosenberg

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:51, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:41, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals to discovery. ~ James Joyce

  • 3 Kalki 22:16, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:51, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:41, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The mocker is never taken seriously when he is most serious. ~ James Joyce

  • 3 Kalki 22:16, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:51, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:41, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

All things are inconstant except the faith in the soul, which changes all things and fills their inconstancy with light, but though I seem to be driven out of my country as a misbeliever I have found no man yet with a faith like mine. ~ James Joyce

  • 3 Kalki 22:16, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:51, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:41, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Sometimes I feel like a figment of my own imagination. ~ Jane Wagner (born 2 February 1935)

  • 3 Kalki 09:23, 2 September 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 23:02, 1 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:41, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

History teaches us that men and nations behave wisely once they have exhausted all other alternatives. ~ Abba Eban (born 2 February 1915)

  • 3 Kalki 14:59, 8 January 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 23:02, 1 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 4 because it is true. Only after making the mistake does mankind realize. Zarbon 21:41, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
The things to do are: the things that need doing, that you see need to be done, and that no one else seems to see need to be done. ~ Buckminster Fuller
  • selected by Kalki
2005
The past is but the beginning of a beginning, and all that is or has been is but the twilight of the dawn. ~ H. G. Wells
  • selected by Kalki
2006
An age is called Dark not because the light fails to shine, but because people refuse to see it. ~ James A. Michener (born c. 3 February 1907)
  • proposed by UDScott
2007
At the bottom of the heart of every human being, from earliest infancy until the tomb, there is something that goes on indomitably expecting, in the teeth of all experience of crimes committed, suffered, and witnessed, that good and not evil will be done to him. It is this above all that is sacred in every human being. ~ Simone Weil (born 3 February 1909)
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2008
When war is waged it is for the purpose of safeguarding or increasing one's capacity to make war. International politics are wholly involved in this vicious cycle. What is called national prestige consists in behaving always in such a way as to demoralize other nations by giving them the impression that, if it comes to war, one would certainly defeat them. What is called national security is an imaginary state of affairs in which one would retain the capacity to make war while depriving all other countries of it. ~ Simone Weil
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2009

Suggestions

The whole duty of man consists in being reasonable and just... I am reasonable because I know the difference between understanding and not understanding and I am just because I have no opinion about things I don’t understand. ~ Gertrude Stein (Date of birth)

  • 3 ~ UDScott 22:03, 1 February 2006 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:59, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I went down to the sacred store
Where I'd heard the music years before
But the man there said the music wouldn't play
And in the streets the children screamed
The lovers cried and the poets dreamed
But not a word was spoken
The church bells all were broken And the three men I admire most
The Father Son and Holy Ghost
They caught the last train for the coast
The day the music died. ~ Don McLean, American Pie, to commemorate The Day the Music Died, on this date in 1959

  • 3 ~ UDScott 22:03, 1 February 2006 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:59, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC) ( and I will try to get around to creating a page for him sometime soon...)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

When you are writing before there is an audience anything written is as important as any other thing and you cherish anything and everything that you have written. After the audience begins, naturally they create something that is they create you, and so not everything is so important, something is more important than another thing. ~ Gertrude Stein (born February 3, 1874)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:59, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

If anything is a surprise then there is not much difference between older and younger because the only thing that does make anybody older is that they cannot be surprised. ~ Gertrude Stein

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:59, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

It always did bother me that the American public were more interested in me than in my work. And after all there is no sense in it because if it were not for my work they would not be interested in me so why should they not be more interested in my work than in me. That is one of the things one has to worry about in America. ~ Gertrude Stein

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:59, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

If the stars are suns and the earth is the earth and there are men only upon this earth and anything can put an end to anything and any dog does anything like anybody does it what is the difference between eternity and anything. ~ Gertrude Stein

  • 4 InvisibleSun 07:59, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Politeness does not interfere with facts, politeness is just another fact. ~ Gertrude Stein

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:59, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

After all, human beings are like that. When they are alone they want to be with others, and when they are with others they want to be alone. ~ Gertrude Stein

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:59, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Men of the most brilliant intelligence can be born, live and die in error and falsehood. In them, intelligence is neither a good, nor even an asset. The difference between more or less intelligent men is like the difference between criminals condemned to life imprisonment in smaller or larger cells. The intelligent man who is proud of his intelligence is like a condemned man who is proud of his large cell. ~ Simone Weil

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:59, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

A profession can confer on quite ordinary men in their exercise of it, virtues which, if they were extended to all circumstances of life, would make of them heroes or saints. ~ Simone Weil

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:59, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Truth is sought not because it is truth but because it is good. ~ Simone Weil

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:59, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Power must not seem to be arbitrarily allocated, because it will not then be recognized as power. Therefore prestige, which is illusion, is of the very essence of power. ~ Simone Weil

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:59, 31 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

God's love for us is not the reason for which we should love him. God's love for us is the reason for us to love ourselves. ~ Simone Weil

  • 3 InvisibleSun 19:33, 2 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:03, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:46, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
If my poetry aims to achieve anything, it's to deliver people from the limited ways in which they see and feel. ~ Jim Morrison
  • selected by Kalki
2005
Our ideals, laws and customs should be based on the proposition that each generation, in turn, becomes the custodian rather than the absolute owner of our resources and each generation has the obligation to pass this inheritance on to the future. ~ Charles Lindbergh (born 4 February 1902)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
If one took no chances, one would not fly at all. Safety lies in the judgment of the chances one takes. That judgment, in turn, must rest upon one’s outlook on life. Any coward can sit in his home and criticize a pilot for flying into a mountain in fog. But I would rather, by far, die on a mountainside than in bed. ~ Charles Lindbergh (born 4 February 1902)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
Men weren't really the enemy — they were fellow victims suffering from an outmoded masculine mystique that made them feel unnecessarily inadequate when there were no bears to kill. ~ Betty Friedan
  • proposed by Fys
2008
Mistakes are part of the game. It's how well you recover from them, that's the mark of a great player. ~ Alice Cooper (born 4 February 1948)
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

There comes a point when a man must refuse to answer to his leader if he is also to answer to his own conscience. ~ Hartley Shawcross, born February 4, 1902.

  • 4. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:51, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 17:21, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • This was already used, on 19 August 2003 ~ Kalki 23:59, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:49, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The feminine mystique has succeeded in burying millions of American women alive. ~ Betty Friedan, born February 4, 1921, died February 4, 2006.

  • 3. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:51, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 17:21, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:59, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:49, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

We are on an irreversible trend towards more freedom and democracy, but that could change. ~ Dan Quayle, born February 4, 1947.

  • 2. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:51, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 17:21, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:59, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:49, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Drinking beer is easy. Trashing your hotel room is easy. But being a Christian, that's a tough call. That's rebellion. ~ Alice Cooper (Vincent Damon Furnier), born February 4, 1948.

  • 3. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:51, 1 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 17:21, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:59, 3 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:49, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
Do what you can, with what you have, where you are ~ Theodore Roosevelt
  • selected by Kalki
2005
I profoundly believe that there is on this horizon, as yet only dimly perceived, a new dawn of conscience. In that purer light, people will come to see themselves in each other, which is to say they will make themselves known to one another by their similarities rather than by their differences. Man's knowledge of things will begin to be matched by man's knowledge of self. The significance of a smaller world will be measured not in terms of military advantage, but in terms of advantage for the human community. It will be the triumph of the heartbeat over the drumbeat. ~ Adlai Stevenson (born 5 February 1900)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
What counts now is not just what we are against, but what we are for. Who leads us is less important than what leads us — what convictions, what courage, what faith — win or lose. ~ Adlai Stevenson (born 5 February 1900)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
God needeth not the help of a material sword of steel to assist the sword of the Spirit in the affairs of conscience. ~ Roger Williams (early advocate of freedom of conscience in religious matters, and the separation of Church and State, he emigrated from England to America on this date in 1631)
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
Let’s talk sense to the American people. Let’s tell them the truth, that there are no gains without pains, that we are now on the eve of great decisions, not easy decisions, like resistance when you're attacked, but a long, patient, costly struggle which alone can assure triumph over the great enemies of man — war, poverty, and tyranny — and the assaults upon human dignity which are the most grievous consequences of each. ~ Adlai Stevenson
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

Enforced uniformity confounds civil and religious liberty and denies the principles of Christianity and civility. No man shall be required to worship or maintain a worship against his will. ~ Roger Williams

  • 3 Kalki 20:58, 5 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:42, 4 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:51, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Men's consciences ought in no sort to be violated, urged, or constrained. ~ Roger Williams

  • 3 Kalki 20:58, 5 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:42, 4 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:51, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I'm Ready, I'm Ready, I'm Ready! ~ Spongebob Squarepants

—This unsigned comment is by 69.253.95.224 (talkcontribs) .
  • 1 Kalki 07:58, 4 February 2008 (UTC) (minor quote, no clear relation to the date)
  • 0 Zarbon 21:51, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
To explain all nature is too difficult a task for any one man or even for any one age. 'Tis much better to do a little with certainty, and leave the rest for others that come after you, than to explain all things. ~ Isaac Newton
  • selected by Kalki
2005, 2006
You and I are told increasingly that we have to choose between a left or right, but I would like to suggest that there is no such thing as a left or right. There is only an up or down — up to a man's age-old dream; the ultimate in individual freedom consistent with law and order — or down to the ant heap totalitarianism, and regardless of their sincerity, their humanitarian motives, those who would trade our freedom for security have embarked on this downward course. ~ Ronald Reagan (born 6 February 1911)
  • selected by Kalki (who erroneously selected it for both 2005 and 2006 because of a failure to check the existing records)
2007
I swing big, with everything I've got. I hit big or I miss big. I like to live as big as I can. ~ Babe Ruth (born 6 February 1895)
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
I do not believe in a fate that will fall on us no matter what we do. I do believe in a fate that will fall on us if we do nothing. So, with all the creative energy at our command, let us begin an era of national renewal. Let us renew our determination, our courage, and our strength. And let us renew our faith and our hope. We have every right to dream heroic dreams. Those who say that we're in a time when there are no heroes, they just don't know where to look. ~ Ronald Reagan
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Quotes by people born this day, already used as QOTD:

  • History teaches that wars begin when governments believe the price of aggression is cheap. ~ Ronald Reagan
  • Whatever else history may say about me when I’m gone, I hope it will record that I appealed to your best hopes, not your worst fears; to your confidence rather than your doubts. My dream is that you will travel the road ahead with liberty’s lamp guiding your steps and opportunity’s arm steadying your way. ~ Ronald Reagan

Suggestions

Every strike brings me closer to the next home run. ~ Babe Ruth

  • 3 Kalki 15:35, 5 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:53, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

It's hard to beat a person who never gives up. ~ Babe Ruth

  • 3 Kalki 15:35, 5 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:53, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it on to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same... ~ Ronald Reagan

  • 3 Kalki 04:44, 5 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:53, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I believe with all my heart that our first priority must be world peace, and that use of force is always and only a last resort, when everything else has failed, and then only with regard to our national security. ~ Ronald Reagan

  • 4 Kalki 04:44, 5 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:53, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The rule of my life is to make business a pleasure and pleasure my business. ~ Aaron Burr (born February 6)

  • 3 because enrichment of one's daily routine requires one to work when unnecessary and relax when work is being done. Sometimes, the shift in vice versa balances a stabilized regime. Zarbon 04:43, 2 May 2008 (UTC)

Never do today what you can put off till tomorrow. Delay may give clearer light as to what is best to be done. ~ Aaron Burr (born February 6)

  • 3 because making a mistake can cost dearly in an upcoming date. Thinking, rationalizing, and delaying before taking action will play a better role. A mistake can, after all, damage more than one's reputation. Zarbon 04:43, 2 May 2008 (UTC)


2005
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way — in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only. ~ Charles Dickens in A Tale of Two Cities (born 7 February 1812)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
He judged it not fit to determine anything rashly; and seemed to doubt whether those different forms of religion might not all come from God, who might inspire man in a different manner, and be pleased with this variety; he therefore thought it indecent and foolish for any man to threaten and terrify another to make him believe what did not appear to him to be true. ~ Thomas More (born 7 February 1478)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
Throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people we most despise. ~ Charles Dickens
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2008

Suggestions

For men use, if they have an evil turn, to write it in marble: and whoso doth us a good turn we write it in dust. ~ Thomas More (born February 7, 1478)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 16:45, 6 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:11, 6 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

There are many pleasant fictions of the law in constant operation, but there is not one so pleasant or practically humorous as that which supposes every man to be of equal value in its impartial eye, and the benefits of all laws to be equally attainable by all men, without the smallest reference to the furniture of their pockets. ~ Charles Dickens (born February 7, 1812)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 16:45, 6 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:11, 6 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Zarbon 21:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Here's the rule for bargains — 'Do other men, for they would do you.' That's the true business precept. ~ Charles Dickens

  • 3 InvisibleSun 16:45, 6 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:11, 6 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Charity begins at home, and justice begins next door. ~ Charles Dickens

  • 3 InvisibleSun 16:45, 6 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:11, 6 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

"Business!" cried the Ghost, wringing its hands again. "Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence, were, all, my business. The dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!" ~ Charles Dickens

  • 3 InvisibleSun 16:45, 6 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:11, 6 February 2008 (UTC) (but I would much prefer to use this sometime in the Christmas season, perhaps on the anniversary of the publication of A Christmas Carol)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

A man acts suitably to his nature, when he conquers his enemy in such a way as that no other creature but a man could be capable of, and that is by the strength of his understanding. ~ Thomas More

  • 4 Kalki 23:11, 6 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2005
All journeys have secret destinations of which the traveler is unaware. ~ Martin Buber (born 8 February 1878)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
There are, indeed, two forms of discontent: one laborious, the other indolent and complaining. We respect the man of laborious desire, but let us not suppose that his restlessness is peace, or his ambition meekness. It is because of the special connection of meekness with contentment that it is promised that the meek shall 'inherit the earth.' Neither covetous men, nor the grave, can inherit anything; they can but consume. Only contentment can possess. ~ John Ruskin (born 8 February 1819)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
One single war — we all know — may be productive of more evil, immediate and subsequent, than hundreds of years of the unchecked action of the mutual-aid principle may be productive of good. ~ Peter Kropotkin, died 8 February 1921.
  • proposed by Fys
2008

Suggestions

All political lives, unless they are cut off in midstream at a happy juncture, end in failure, because that is the nature of politics and of human affairs. ~ Enoch Powell, died 8 February 1998.

  • 4. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:44, 5 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:44, 7 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The good Samaritan had compassion. If two good Samaritans had compassion, that would still be individual compassion, not collective compassion. If the good Samaritan had been obliged by decree of the Roman Emperor to assist the traveller, that would not be compassion at all, because it would be done under obligation. ~ Enoch Powell.

  • 2. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:44, 5 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:44, 7 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Remember that the most beautiful things in the world are the most useless: peacocks and lilies, for instance. ~ John Ruskin, born 8 February 1819.

  • 3. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:44, 5 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 ~ Kalki 23:44, 7 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Man's constitution is so peculiar that his health is purely a negative matter. No sooner is the rage of hunger appeased than it becomes difficult to comprehend the meaning of starvation. It is only when you suffer that you really understand. ~ Jules Verne, born 8 February 1828.

  • 3. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:44, 5 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:44, 7 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 4 because suffering truly teaches better than any other way of understanding. A man can only understand the suffering he has given if he himself suffers. Charming quote. Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

There is no wealth but life. Life, including all its powers of love, of joy, and of admiration. That country is the richest which nourishes the greatest numbers of noble and happy human beings; that man is richest, who, having perfected the functions of his own life to the utmost, has also the widest helpful influence, both personal, and by means of his possessions, over the lives of others. ~ John Ruskin

  • 3 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

When we are interested in the beauty of a thing, the oftener we can see it the better; but when we are interested only by the story of a thing, we get tired of hearing the same tale told over and over again, and stopping always at the same point — we want a new story presently, a newer and better one — and the picture of the day, and novel of the day, become as ephemeral as the coiffure or the bonnet of the day. Now this spirit is wholly adverse to the existence of any lovely art. If you mean to throw it aside to-morrow, you can never have it to-day. ~ John Ruskin

  • 3 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Your honesty is not to be based either on religion or policy. Both your religion and policy must be based on it. Your honesty must be based, as the sun is, in vacant heaven; poised, as the lights in the firmament, which have rule over the day and over the night. ~ John Ruskin

  • 3 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Punishment is the last and least effective instrument in the hands of the legislator for the prevention of crime. ~ John Ruskin

  • 3 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 because this is true. People should be worried moreso about prevention than punishment. Excellent quote. Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

An unimaginative person can neither be reverent nor kind. ~ John Ruskin

  • 3 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

It is the glistening and softly spoken lie; the amiable fallacy; the patriotic lie of the historian, the provident lie of the politician, the zealous lie of the partisan, the merciful lie of the friend, and the careless lie of each man to himself, that cast that black mystery over humanity, through which we thank any man who pierces, as we would thank one who dug a well in a desert. ~ John Ruskin

  • 3 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

There is never vulgarity in a whole truth, however commonplace. It may be unimportant or painful. It cannot be vulgar. Vulgarity is only in concealment of truth, or in affectation. ~ John Ruskin

  • 3 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world is to see something, and tell what it saw in a plain way. Hundreds of people can talk for one who can think, but thousands can think for one who can see. To see clearly is poetry, prophecy, and religion, — all in one. ~ John Ruskin

  • 4 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 4 Kalki 00:00, 8 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Life without industry is guilt, and industry without art is brutality. ~ John Ruskin

  • 3 InvisibleSun 01:12, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Every other sin hath some pleasure annexed to it, or will admit of an excuse; envy alone wants both. Other sins last but for awhile; the gut may be satisfied, anger remits, hatred hath an end, envy never ceaseth. ~ Robert Burton (born February 8, 1577)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 10:40, 7 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:02, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength. ~ Eric Hoffer
  • selected by Moby
2005
My life has been a tapestry of rich and royal hue,
An everlasting vision of the everchanging view,
A wondrous woven magic in bits of blue and gold,
A tapestry to feel and see, impossible to hold.

~ Carole King (born 9 February 1942)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
Does it really matter what these affectionate people do — so long as they don’t do it in the streets and frighten the horses? ~ Mrs Patrick Campbell (born 9 February 1865)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
Belief may be no more, in the end, than a source of energy, like a battery which one clips into an idea to make it run. ~ J. M. Coetzee
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
You've got to get up every morning with a smile in your face
And show the world all the love in your heart
The people gonna treat you better,
You're gonna find, yes you will,
That you're beautiful as you feel.

~ Carole King ~
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

To care only for well-being seems to me positively ill-bred. Whether it’s good or bad, it is sometimes very pleasant, too, to smash things. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky, (died 9 February, 1881). (Notes from the Underground)

  • 4. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:14, 8 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 03:13, 9 February 2008 (UTC) 2 Kalki 23:44, 8 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 4 because Dostoyevsky says it the way humans feel it. Excellent, sometimes it is better to get the anger out. I love this quote. Zarbon 22:05, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

It is not as a child that I believe and confess Jesus Christ. My hosanna is born of a furnace of doubt. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov.

  • 3. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:14, 8 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:44, 8 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:05, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Truth is not spoken in anger. Truth is spoken, if it ever comes to be spoken, in love. ~ J. M. Coetzee

  • 3 Kalki 23:44, 8 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:05, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I am a ridiculous man. They call me a madman now. That would be a distinct rise in my social position were it not that they still regard me as being as ridiculous as ever. But that does not make me angry any more. They are all dear to me now even while they laugh at me — yes, even then they are for some reason particularly dear to me. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky

  • 3 Kalki 20:37, 8 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:05, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

To study the meaning of man and of life — I am making significant progress here. I have faith in myself. Man is a mystery: if you spend your entire life trying to puzzle it out, then do not say that you have wasted your time. I occupy myself with this mystery, because I want to be a man. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky

  • 3 Kalki 20:37, 8 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:05, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky

  • 3 Kalki 20:37, 8 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:05, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
Misunderstandings and neglect occasion more mischief in the world than even malice and wickedness. At all events, the two latter are of less frequent occurrence. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe in The Sorrows of Young Werther
  • selected by Kalki
2005
Be nice to people on your way up, because you're going to meet them all on your way down. ~ Jimmy Durante (born 10 February 1893)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
What for centuries raised man above the beast is not the cudgel but the irresistible power of unarmed truth. ~ Boris Pasternak (born 10 February 1890)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
I have read descriptions of Paradise that would make any sensible person stop wanting to go there. ~ Charles de Montesquieu (died 10 February 1755)
  • proposed by Fys
2008
Our theater must stimulate a desire for understanding, a delight in changing reality. Our audience must experience not only the ways to free Prometheus, but be schooled in the very desire to free him. Theater must teach all the pleasures and joys of discovery, all the feelings of triumph associated with liberation. ~ Bertolt Brecht (born 10 February 1898)
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

Society cannot share a common communication system so long as it is split into warring factions. ~ Bertolt Brecht, born 10 February 1898.

  • 3. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:28, 8 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:05, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:45, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:08, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The man who laughs has simply not yet had the terrible news. ~ Bertolt Brecht.

  • 3. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:28, 8 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:05, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:45, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:08, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Reason gains all people by compelling none. ~ Attributed to Aaron Hill, born 10 February 1685.

  • 3, an antidote to the misery of the above three. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:28, 8 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:05, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:45, 9 February 2007 (UTC) This I might rank as a 4 if a definite source could be found.
  • 1 Zarbon 22:08, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I love to lose myself in other men's minds. ~ Charles Lamb (born February 10, 1775)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:05, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:45, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:08, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

How sickness enlarges the dimensions of a man's self to himself. ~ Charles Lamb

  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:05, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:45, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:08, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I am determined my children shall be brought up in their father's religion, if they can find out what it is. - Charles Lamb

  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:05, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:45, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:08, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

No one can be good for long if goodness is not in demand. ~ Bertolt Brecht

  • 3 Kalki 23:45, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Zarbon 22:08, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Don't be afraid of death so much as an inadequate life. ~ Bertolt Brecht

  • 3 Kalki 23:45, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 4 because this is one of my solid beliefs. Nothing is worse than a wasted life. Zarbon 22:08, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Let nothing be called natural
In an age of bloody confusion,
Ordered disorder, planned caprice,
And dehumanized humanity, lest all things
Be held unalterable!

~ Bertolt Brecht ~

  • 3 Kalki 23:45, 9 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:08, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

What answer can we give to the families of victims of the Karabakh movement and to those who have become disabled. Why did their sons fight? And about Turkey, we cannot leave the word genocide out of our vocabulary and forget about the 1.5 million victims. ~ Mikael Harutyunyan (born February 10)

  • 3 Zarbon 05:01, 18 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
Fanaticism consists in redoubling your effort when you have forgotten your aim. ~ George Santayana
  • selected by Kalki
2005
If one knows only what one is told, one does not know enough to be able to arrive at a well-balanced decision. ~ Leó Szilárd (born 11 February 1898)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
When writing about transcendental issues, be transcendentally clear. ~ René Descartes (died 11 February 1650)
  • proposed by Inhuman14
2007
Even if we accept, as the basic tenet of true democracy, that one moron is equal to one genius, is it necessary to go a further step and hold that two morons are better than one genius? ~ Leó Szilárd (born 11 February 1898)
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
In Common Sense Paine flared forth with a document so powerful that the Revolution became inevitable. Washington recognized the difference, and in his calm way said that matters never could be the same again. ~ Thomas Alva Edison (born 11 February 1847)
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2009

Suggestions

I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. ~ Thomas Edison (Birth date)

  • proposed by Liquidice5
  • 1. I don't dislike this (anonymously submitted) quote; but it appears on the Edison page as one variant among several in the Unsourced section. For this reason I wouldn't feel any confidence in selecting it. - InvisibleSun 17:16, 10 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 00:16, 12 February 2008 (UTC) 2 Kalki 23:14, 10 February 2007 (UTC) ranking this a bit higher, as sourcing for it is a bit stronger now, but there are still enough variants to lack confidence in the accuracy of any.
  • 2. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:24, 10 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 because this may be true, since only through trial and tribulation do people discover things. It also emphasizes the human will to go on, very nice quote. Zarbon 22:11, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Every man deems that he has precisely the trials and temptations which are the hardest of all others for him to bear; but they are so, simply because they are the very ones he most needs. ~ Lydia Maria Child (born February 11, 1802).

  • 3 InvisibleSun 17:16, 10 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:14, 10 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 because I don't agree with it. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:24, 10 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:11, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I was sixteen years old when the first World War broke out, and I lived at that time in Hungary. From reading the newspapers in Hungary, it would have appeared that, whatever Austria and Germany did was right and whatever England, France, Russia, or America did was wrong. A good case could be made out for this general thesis, in almost every single instance. It would have been difficult for me to prove, in any single instance, that the newspapers were wrong, but somehow, it seemed to me unlikely that the two nations located in the center of Europe should be invariably right, and that all the other nations should be invariably wrong. History, I reasoned, would hardly operate in such a peculiar fashion, and it didn't take long until I began to hold views which were diametrically opposed to those held by the majority of my schoolmates. ~ Leó Szilárd (born February 11, 1898)

  • 3 (A little long, perhaps, for a Quote of the Day?) InvisibleSun 17:16, 10 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:14, 10 February 2007 (UTC) (but it is a bit long, and I would trim it slightly to begin with "From reading the newspapers in Hungary..." and even then it remains a bit long...
  • 3 if trimmed. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:24, 10 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:11, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The people who have sufficient passion for the truth to give the truth a chance to prevail, if it runs counter to their bias, are in a minority. How important is this "minority?" It is difficult to say at this point, for, at the present time their influence on governmental decisions is not perceptible. ~ Leó Szilárd (born February 11, 1898)

  • 3 Kalki 23:14, 10 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3. Good point but difficult to express concisely. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 23:24, 10 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 23:26, 10 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:11, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
If we cannot end now our differences, at least we can make the world safe for diversity. ~ John F. Kennedy
  • selected by Kalki
2005
The apple cannot be stuck back on the Tree of Knowledge; once we begin to see, we are doomed and challenged to seek the strength to see more, not less. ~ Arthur Miller (recent death)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
Let us have faith that right makes might, and in that faith, let us, to the end, dare to do our duty as we understand it. ~ Abraham Lincoln (born 12 February 1809)
  • proposed by Kalki
2007
We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature. ~ Abraham Lincoln
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those who know little, not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science. ~ Charles Darwin (born 12 February 1809)
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2009

Suggestions

Allow the President to invade a neighboring nation whenever he shall deem it necessary to repel an invasion, and you allow him to do so whenever he may choose to say he deems it necessary for such purpose, and you allow him to make war at pleasure. ~ Abraham Lincoln (Birth date)

  • proposed by Liquidice5
  • 3 Kalki 00:29, 11 February 2007 (UTC) 2 Kalki 23:39, 11 February 2006 (UTC) but I would wish to extend it with "Study to see if you can fix any limit to his power in this respect, after having given him so much as you propose" if it were to be used.
  • 3, with extension. InvisibleSun 18:49, 11 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:14, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations. ~ Abraham Lincoln

  • 4 ~ Kalki 00:10, 12 February 2008 (UTC) 3 Kalki 00:29, 11 February 2007 (UTC) was leaning toward this for 2008, but preferred to save it for Lincoln's 200th birthday in 2009. ~ Kalki 23:51, 11 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 18:49, 11 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:14, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

He defended and praised slavery, which I abominated, and told me that he had just visited a great slave-owner, who had called up many of his slaves and asked them whether they were happy, and whether they wished to be free, and all answered "No." I then asked him, perhaps with a sneer, whether he thought that the answer of slaves in the presence of their master was worth anything? ~ Charles Darwin

  • 3 InvisibleSun 18:49, 11 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:51, 11 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:14, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Not till the fire is dying in the grate,
Look we for any kinship with the stars.
Oh, wisdom never comes when it is gold,
And the great price we pay for it full worth:
We have it only when we are half earth.
~ George Meredith (born February 12, 1828)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 18:49, 11 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:51, 11 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:14, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

More brain, O Lord, more brain! or we shall mar
Utterly this fair garden we might win.
~ George Meredith

  • 3 InvisibleSun 18:49, 11 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:51, 11 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:14, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I would not have believed such an inferno could open up on earth. Men died but they did not retreat. ~ Vasily Chuikov (born February 12)

  • 3 Zarbon 04:07, 18 April 2008 (UTC)
    • SOURCE: Europe in Our Time, 1914 to the Present - Page 571 by Robert Reinhold Ergang -Europe - 1948

He who knows the truth and does not speak it is a miserable coward. - Julius Streicher

  • 3 Zarbon 16:57, 25 September 2008 (UTC)


2005
In this moment, I need to be needed,
With this darkness all around me, I like to be liked,
In this emptiness and fear, I want to be wanted,
'Cause I love to be loved,
I love to be loved.

~ Peter Gabriel (born 13 February 1950)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
Life is what it is, and you take what's handed, and you work as hard as you can, and hopefully you'll be successful, but I just don't spend too much time worrying about that. ~ Jerry Springer (born 13 February 1944)
  • proposed by User:Liquidice5
2007
Every man's life (and ... every woman's life), awaits the hour of blossoming that makes it immortal ... love is a divinity above all accidents, and guards his own with extraordinary obstinacy. ~ Eleanor Farjeon (born 13 February 1881)
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
Love has no uttermost, as the stars have no number and the sea no rest. ~ Eleanor Farjeon
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Quotes by people born this day, already used as QOTD:

Suggestions

Of what use to destroy the children of evil? It is evil itself we must destroy at the roots. ~ Eleanor Farjeon

  • 3 Kalki 04:14, 13 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:16, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Morning has broken,
Like the first morning,
Blackbird has spoken
Like the first bird.
Praise for the singing!
Praise for the morning!
Praise for them springing
Fresh from the Word!

~ Eleanor Farjeon ~

  • 3 Kalki 04:14, 13 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:16, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
True love is inexhaustible; the more you give, the more you have. ~ Antoine de Saint-Exupery
  • selected by Kalki
2005
Love is that condition in which the happiness of another person is essential to your own. ~ Robert A. Heinlein, Stranger in a Strange Land
2006
Some things you don't need until they leave you; they're the things that you miss. ~ Rob Thomas (born 14 February 1972)
  • proposed by User:Sir John Alexander Macdonald
2007
When one has once fully entered the realm of love, the world — no matter how imperfect — becomes rich and beautiful, it consists solely of opportunities for love. ~ Søren Kierkegaard
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
Love suffers long and is kind; love does not envy; love does not parade itself, is not puffed up; does not behave rudely, does not seek its own, is not provoked, thinks no evil; does not rejoice in iniquity, but rejoices in the truth; bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.
Love never fails. But whether there are prophecies, they will fail; whether there are tongues, they will cease; whether there is knowledge, it will vanish away. For we know in part and we prophesy in part. But when that which is perfect has come, then that which is in part will be done away.
When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child; but when I became a man, I put away childish things. For now we see in a mirror, dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part, but then I shall know just as I also am known.
And now abide faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love. ~ Paul of Tarsus
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

Remember only this of our hopeless love
That never till Time is done
Will the fire of the heart and the fire of the mind be one.

~ Edith Sitwell ~

  • 3 Kalki 21:38, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:26, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Poetlister 22:36, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:20, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday's
Most quiet need, by sun and candlelight.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,— I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life! — and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning ~

OR perhaps trimmed down to :

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways... ~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning

OR

I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life! — and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning ~

  • 3 Kalki 21:38, 13 February 2007 (UTC) for either the full verse or trimmed down to the ending, or the first four lines.
  • 3, with a preference for the full verse. - InvisibleSun 22:26, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 4 for 1st line only Poetlister 22:36, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 for the verse in its entirety Zarbon 22:20, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

If thou must love me, let it be for nought
Except for love's sake only. Do not say
"I love her for her smile —her look —her way
Of speaking gently,—for a trick of thought
That falls in well with mine, and certes brought
A sense of pleasant ease on such a day" -
For these things in themselves, Beloved, may
Be changed, or change for thee,—and love, so wrought,
May be unwrought so. Neither love me for
Thine own dear pity's wiping my cheeks dry, —
A creature might forget to weep, who bore
Thy comfort long, and lose thy love thereby!
But love me for love's sake, that evermore
Thou may'st love on, through love's eternity
~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning ~

OR perhaps trimmed down to :

If thou must love me, let it be for nought
Except for love's sake only...
love me for love's sake, that evermore
Thou may'st love on, through love's eternity.

~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning ~

  • 3 Kalki 21:38, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3, with a preference for the trimmed version. InvisibleSun 22:26, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 for the verse in its entirety Zarbon 22:20, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O, no! it is an ever-fixed mark,
That looks on tempests and is never shaken...

~ William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116 ~

  • 3 Kalki 21:38, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:26, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:20, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle's compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.

If this be error and upon me prov'd,
I never writ, nor no man ever lov'd.
~ William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116 ~
  • 3 Kalki 21:38, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:26, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:20, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I have become sounding brass or a clanging cymbal. And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, but have not love, it profits me nothing. ~ Paul of Tarsus

  • 2 Kalki 23:51, 13 February 2008 (UTC) 3 Kalki 21:38, 13 February 2007 (UTC)I would like to use this eventually, but would now trim the last sentence, at least if it was used as a Valentine's Day quote.
  • 4 InvisibleSun 22:26, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:20, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Love all of God's creation, the whole of it and every grain of sand in it. Love every leaf, every ray of God's light. Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, you will perceive the divine mystery in things. Once you have perceived it, you will begin to comprehend it better every day, and you will come at last to love the world with an all-embracing love. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky

  • 3 Kalki 21:38, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:26, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:20, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Love does not dominate; it cultivates ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

  • 3 Kalki 21:38, 13 February 2007 (UTC) But tenuously, as I have not yet found a source for this.
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:26, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:20, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Love, in the final analysis, is wisdom. ~ E. W. Kenyon

  • 3 Kalki 21:38, 13 February 2007 (UTC) (But there is not yet a page for this author, I will probably attempt to make one soon.)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:26, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:20, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

For one human being to love another: that is perhaps the most difficult of all our tasks, the ultimate, the last test and proof, the work for which all other work is but preparation. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke

  • 3 Kalki 21:38, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:26, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:20, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

For God's sake, hold your tongue and let me love! - John Donne

  • 3 --Poetlister 22:36, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 15:51, 13 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:20, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2005
All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; the point is to discover them. ~ Galileo Galilei (born 15 February 1564)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forego their use. ~ Galileo Galilei (born 15 February 1564)
  • proposed by Kalki
2007
The religious persecution of the ages has been done under what was claimed to be the command of God. I distrust those people who know so well what God wants them to do to their fellows, because it always coincides with their own desires. ~ Susan B. Anthony (born 15 February 1920)
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
Kings had always been involving and impoverishing their people in wars, pretending generally, if not always, that the good of the people was the object. This our convention understood to be the most oppressive of all kingly oppressions, and they resolved to so frame the Constitution that no one man should hold the power of bringing this oppression upon us. ~ U.S. Congressman Abraham Lincoln, 15 February 1848 letter to William H. Herndon, opposing the Mexican-American War
  • proposed by Jeff Q
2009

Suggestions

If you love something let it go free. If it doesn't come back, you never had it. If it comes back, love it forever. ~ Doug Horton

  • proposed by user Sir John Alexander Macdonald
  • 1 Kalki 22:55, 14 February 2006 (UTC) The bulk of the quote derives from a well known proverb of the sixties that I doubt originated with Horton.
  • 1 Zarbon 22:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

One-half of the people of this nation to-day are utterly powerless to blot from the statute books an unjust law, or to write there a new and a just one. ~ Susan B. Anthony (born 15 February 1920)

  • 2 Kalki 18:28, 14 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:43, 14 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I shall earnestly and persistently continue to urge all women to the practical recognition of the old revolutionary maxim, that "Resistance to tyranny is obedience to God." ~ Susan B. Anthony (born 15 February 1920)

  • 3 Kalki 18:28, 14 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:43, 14 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Cautious, careful people, always casting about to preserve their reputation and social standing, never can bring about a reform. Those who are really in earnest must be willing to be anything or nothing in the world's estimation. ~ Susan B. Anthony (born 15 February 1920)

  • 4 Kalki 18:28, 14 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:43, 14 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Religion will not regain its old power until it can face change in the same spirit as does science. Its principles may be eternal, but the expression of those principles requires continual development. ~ Alfred North Whitehead (born February 15, 1861)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 19:44, 14 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

It is the business of the future to be dangerous; and it is among the merits of science that it equips the future for its duties. ~ Alfred North Whitehead

  • 3 InvisibleSun 19:44, 14 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

A religious education is an education which inculcates duty and reverence. Duty arises from our potential control over the course of events. Where attainable knowledge could have changed the issue, ignorance has the guilt of vice. And the foundation of reverence is this perception, that the present holds within itself the complete sum of existence, backwards and forwards, that whole amplitude of time, which is eternity. ~ Alfred North Whitehead

  • 3 InvisibleSun 19:44, 14 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The justification for a university is that it preserves the connection between knowledge and the zest of life, by uniting the young and the old in the imaginative consideration of learning. ~ Alfred North Whitehead

  • 3 InvisibleSun 19:44, 14 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
I'd rather learn from one bird how to sing than teach ten thousand stars how not to dance. ~ e. e. cummings
  • selected by Kalki
2005
A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops. ~ Henry Adams (born 16 February 1838)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
Politics, as a practice, whatever its professions, has always been the systematic organization of hatreds. ~ Henry Adams (born 16 February 1838)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
The counsels of impatience and hatred can always be supported by the crudest and cheapest symbols; for the counsels of moderation, the reasons are often intricate, rather than emotional, and difficult to explain. And so the chauvinists of all times and places go their appointed way: plucking the easy fruits, reaping the little triumphs of the day at the expense of someone else tomorrow, deluging in noise and filth anyone who gets in their way, dancing their reckless dance on the prospects for human progress, drawing the shadow of a great doubt over the validity of democratic institutions. And until people learn to spot the fanning of mass emotions and the sowing of bitterness, suspicion, and intolerance as crimes in themselves — as perhaps the greatest disservice that can be done to the cause of popular government — this sort of thing will continue to occur. ~ George F. Kennan
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
Public opinion, or what passes for public opinion, is not invariably a moderating force in the jungle of politics. It may be true, and I suspect it is, that the mass of people everywhere are normally peace-loving and would accept many restraints and sacrifices in preference to the monstrous calamities of war. But I also suspect that what purports to be public opinion in most countries that consider themselves to have popular government is often not really the consensus of the feelings of the mass of the people at all, but rather the expression of the interests of special highly vocal minorities — politicians, commentators, and publicity-seekers of all sorts: people who live by their ability to draw attention to themselves and die, like fish out of water, if they are compelled to remain silent. ~ George F. Kennan
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

Condemn me, it does not matter: history will absolve me. ~ Fidel Castro proclaimed Prime Minister of Cuba 16 February 1959.

  • 4 if only because there is a dearth of entries relating to people who were born or died on this date. Fys. “Ta fys aym”. 00:58, 15 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 20:24, 15 February 2007 (UTC) Though I might rank this a 3 or more on a date with a more notable linkage. I generally prefer to do birthdays and highly notable anniversaries when possible, and am disinclined to use death dates save where birthdates are unknown, and minor linkages only when no great quotes can be found with stronger ones.
  • 2 InvisibleSun 22:21, 15 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 4 because this is another of my strong beliefs. History finds ways to absolve. This is another of my favorites and I wish I had brought it up myself. Also, it should be moved to Castro's birth or death date instead. Zarbon 22:24, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

There is a real question as to whether "bigness" in a body politic is not an evil in itself, quite aside from the policies pursued in its name. ~ George F. Kennan

  • 3 Kalki 20:24, 15 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:21, 15 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:24, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I certainly have enough self-confidence...I told myself that I shall either be a general at thirty, or that I shall not be alive by then. ~ Mikhail Tukhachevsky

  • 3 because the strong hint of do or die trying lives inside this quote. Zarbon 02:52, 27 September 2008 (UTC)


2004
Treat a person as he is, and he will remain as he is. Treat him as he could be, and he will become what he should be. ~ Anonymous
  • selected by Sasha
2005
There is one simple Divinity found in all things, everything has Divinity latent within itself. For she enfolds and imparts herself even unto the smallest beings. Without her presence nothing would have being, because she is the essence of the existence of the first unto the last being. ~ Giordano Bruno (died 17 February 1600)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
Some people want it to happen, some wish it would happen, others make it happen. ~ Michael Jordan (born 17 February 1963)
  • proposed by User:Sir John Alexander Macdonald
2007
Even to have come forth is something, since I see that being able to conquer is placed in the hands of fate. However, there was in me, whatever I was able to do, that which no future century will deny to be mine, that which a victor could have for his own: Not to have feared to die, not to have yielded to any equal in firmness of nature, and to have preferred a courageous death to a noncombatant life. ~ Giordano Bruno (executed 17 February 1600)
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
A voiceless song in an ageless light
Sings at the coming dawn
Birds in flight are calling there
Where the heart moves the stones
It's there that my heart is calling
All for the love of you.

~ Loreena McKennitt ~
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

All things are in the Universe, and the universe is in all things: we in it, and it in us; in this way everything concurs in a perfect unity. ~ Giordano Bruno

  • 3 Kalki 17:17, 16 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:25, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
What a man believes may be ascertained, not from his creed, but from the assumptions on which he habitually acts. ~ George Bernard Shaw
  • selected by Kalki
2005 
Teachers are those who use themselves as bridges, over which they invite their students to cross; then having facilitated their crossing, joyfully collapse, encouraging them to create bridges of their own. ~ Nikos Kazantzakis (born 18 February 1883)
  • selected by Kalki
2006 
At some point in life the world's beauty becomes enough. You don't need to photograph, paint or even remember it. It is enough. No record of it needs to be kept and you don't need someone to share it with or tell it to. When that happens — that letting go — you let go because you can. ~ Toni Morrison (born 18 February 1931)
  • proposed by Kalki
2007
The doors of heaven and hell are adjacent and identical. ~ Nikos Kazantzakis
  • proposed by User:Kalki
2008
 ;My prayer is not the whimpering of a beggar nor a confession of love. Nor is it the petty reckoning of a small tradesman: Give me and I shall give you. My prayer is the report of a soldier to his general: This is what I did today, this is how I fought to save the entire battle in my own sector, these are the obstacles I encountered, this is how I plan to fight tomorrow. ~ Nikos Kazantzakis
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great. ~ Mark Twain (Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was published for the first time)

  • proposed by user Sir John Alexander Macdonald
  • 0 Kalki 19:50, 16 February 2007 (UTC) 2 Kalki 23:38, 17 February 2006 (UTC) I would rank this higher with a stronger date tie-in, but I don't believe it's actually from Huckleberry Finn I had suspected this wasn't Twain, but was pretty certain that it wasn't from Huckleberry Finn; as JeffQ's research below indicates there is no reason to accept Twain as the author of this.
  • 0 Jeff Q (talk) 04:51, 29 April 2006 (UTC), unless we can find the correct source. Neither Wikisource nor Project Gutenberg, both of which include Huckleberry Finn, appear to have any Twain work with both the words "belittle" and "ambitions", so we can't even confirm Twain said it, let alone the appropriateness of this date.
  • 0 Zarbon 22:28, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

You forgot the first rule of the fanatic: when you become obsessed with the enemy, you become the enemy. ~ Michael O'Hare as "Jeffrey Sinclair", Babylon 5 episode "Infection" (first aired 18 February 1994)

  • 2 Jeff Q (talk) 04:51, 29 April 2006 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 19:33, 16 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 11:09, 17 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 because this is true. Many times opponents have become the very thing they hate. I like this quote. Zarbon 22:28, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The highest point a man can obtain is not Knowledge, or Virtue, or Goodness, or Victory, but something even greater, more heroic and more despairing: Sacred Awe! ~ Nikos Kazantzakis

  • 3 Kalki 19:33, 16 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 11:09, 17 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:28, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I hope for nothing. I fear nothing. I am free. ~ Nikos Kazantzakis

  • 3 Kalki 19:33, 16 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 11:09, 17 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:28, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us ~ Bill Watterson
  • selected by Kalki
2005
I am not so enamored of my own opinions that I disregard what others may think of them. I am aware that a philosopher's ideas are not subject to the judgement of ordinary persons, because it is his endeavor to seek the truth in all things, to the extent permitted to human reason by God. Yet I hold that completely erroneous views should be shunned. ~ Nicolaus Copernicus (born 19 February 1473)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
External success has to do with people who may see me as a model, or an example, or a representative. As much as I may dislike or want to reject that responsibility, this is something that comes with public success. It's important to give others a sense of hope that it is possible and you can come from really different places in the world and find your own place in the world that's unique for yourself. ~ Amy Tan (born 19 February 1952)
  • proposed by Kalki
2007
Hello darkness, my old friend
I've come to talk with you again
Because a vision softly creeping
Left its seeds while I was sleeping
And the vision that was planted in my brain
Still remains
Within the sound of silence.

~ Paul Simon ~
(Lyrics to "The Sound of Silence" — written on this day in 1964)
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
Now that your rose is in bloom,
A light hits the gloom on the grave,
I've been kissed by a rose on the grave.

~ Seal ~
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

"You're a religious man. You believe in God and life after death. I also believe. When we come to the other world and meet the millions of Jews who died in the camps and they ask us, 'What have you done?' there will be many answers. You will say, 'I became a jeweler.' Another will say, 'I smuggled coffee and American cigarettes.' Still another will say, 'I built houses,' but I will say, 'I didn't forget you.' ~ Simon Wiesenthal (He was an honorary knighthood)

  • proposed by user Sir John Alexander Macdonald
  • 2 Kalki 23:32, 20 February 2006 (UTC) but not a very strong date tie-in, and I think there are many better quotes by Wiesenthal
  • 1 Zarbon 22:29, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

It is because I had so much joy that I came to have so much hate. ~ Amy Tan

  • 2 because both joy and hate are but human emotions. Zarbon 05:17, 1 May 2008 (UTC)


2004
There can be no Friendship where there is no Freedom. Friendship loves a free Air, and will not be penned up in streight and narrow Enclosures. It will speak freely, and act so too; and take nothing ill where no ill is meant; nay, where it is, ’twill easily forgive, and forget too, upon small Acknowledgments. ~ William Penn
  • selected by Kalki
2005
All in all is all we are. ~ Kurt Cobain (born 20 February 20, 1967)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
We picked up everything we could get our hands on. Not that we needed all that for the trip, but once you get locked into a serious drug-collection, the tendency is to push it as far as you can.
The only thing that really worried me was the ether. There is nothing in the world more helpless and irresponsible and depraved than a man in the depths of an ether binge. And I knew we'd get into that rotten stuff pretty soon. ~ Hunter S. Thompson (died 20 February 2005)
  • proposed by Sir John Alexander Macdonald
2007
If there is no struggle, there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its many waters. This struggle may be a moral one; or it may be a physical one; or it may be both moral and physical; but it must be a struggle. ~ Frederick Douglass
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what a people will submit to, and you have found out the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress. Men may not get all they pay for in this world; but they must pay for all they get. ~ Frederick Douglass (died February 20, 1895; born February 1817/1818, birthdate unknown)
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2009

Suggestions

No man can put a chain about the ankle of his fellow man without at last finding the other end fastened about his own neck. ~ Frederick Douglass

  • 3 InvisibleSun 17:36, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 21:38, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 4 because this is extremely true if anything. No one can commit to a sin and not find that he himself is somewhat guilty. Very nice. I love this one. Zarbon 22:32, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Slaves sing most when they are most unhappy. The songs of the slave represent the sorrows of his heart; and he is relieved by them, only as an aching heart is relieved by its tears. At least, such is my experience. ~ Frederick Douglass

  • 3 InvisibleSun 17:36, 13 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 21:38, 13 February 2007 (UTC) but perhaps extending it, or replacing it with the extension: "I have often sung to drown my sorrow, but seldom to express my happiness. Crying for joy, and singing for joy, were alike uncommon to me while in the jaws of slavery. The singing of a man cast away upon a desolate island might be as appropriately considered as evidence of contentment and happiness, as the singing of a slave; the songs of the one and of the other are prompted by the same emotion." (of either option I am still inclined to rank them at 3).
I would also rate the alternative as a 3. - InvisibleSun 21:26, 19 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:32, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I will, in the name of humanity which is outraged, in the name of liberty which is fettered, in the name of the constitution and the Bible, which are disregarded and trampled upon, dare to call in question and to denounce, with all the emphasis I can command, everything that serves to perpetuate slavery — the great sin and shame of America! "I will not equivocate; I will not excuse;" I will use the severest language I can command; and yet not one word shall escape me that any man, whose judgement is not blinded by prejudice, or who is not at heart a slaveholder, shall not confess to be right and just. ~ Frederick Douglass

  • 3 Kalki 14:47, 19 February 2007 (UTC) I would rank this equally, if cut down to begin at "I will not equivocate; I will not excuse;"... I have no strong preference for either option.
  • 3. I would favor the longer quotation in this case. I wonder how many readers, seeing words in quotation marks, will be curious to know the source (William Lloyd Garrison) of this quote within a quote. - InvisibleSun 21:26, 19 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:32, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Our world is in profound danger. Mankind must establish a set of positive values with which to secure its own survival.
This quest for enlightenment must begin now.
It is essential that all men and women become aware of what they are, why they are here on Earth and what they must do to preserve civilization before it is too late. ~ Richard Matheson (born 20 February 1926)

  • 4 Kalki 22:25, 19 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:32, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
Careful the things you say, children will listen. Guide them along the way, children will see and learn. Children may not obey, but children will look to you for which way to turn; to learn what to be! Careful before you say "Listen to Me." Children will listen. ~ Into the Woods (Sondheim/Lapine)
  • selected by IP 172.134.14.22
2005
For the error bred in the bone
Of each woman and each man
Craves what it cannot have,
Not universal love
But to be loved alone.

~ W. H. Auden (born 21 February 1907)
  • selected by Kalki
2006 
When others asked the truth of me, I was convinced it was not the truth they wanted, but an illusion they could bear to live with. ~ Anaïs Nin (born 21 February 1903)
  • proposed by Kalki
2007
Defenceless under the night
Our world in stupor lies;
Yet, dotted everywhere,
Ironic points of light
Flash out wherever the Just
Exchange their messages:
May I, composed like them
Of Eros and of dust,
Beleaguered by the same
Negation and despair,
Show an affirming flame.

~ W. H. Auden ~
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
Life is a process of becoming, a combination of states we have to go through. Where people fail is that they wish to elect a state and remain in it. This is a kind of death. ~ Anaïs Nin
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Quotes by people born this day, already used as QOTD:

  • Each friend represents a world in us, a world possibly not born until they arrive, and it is only by this meeting that a new world is born. ~ Anaïs Nin
  • There are very few human beings who receive the truth, complete and staggering, by instant illumination. Most of them acquire it fragment by fragment, on a small scale, by successive developments, cellularly, like a laborious mosaic. ~ Anaïs Nin
  • We don't see things as they are, we see things as we are. ~ Anaïs Nin
    • Used 14 September 2004, selected by Kalki [originally this was an unsourced quote, but is now a disputed one, with no definite source as yet found. ~ Kalki 18:58, 20 February 2008 (UTC)]

Suggestions

I believe in the brotherhood of man, all men, but I don't believe in brotherhood with anybody who doesn't want brotherhood with me. I believe in treating people right, but I'm not going to waste my time trying to treat somebody right who doesn't know how to return the treatment. ~ Malcolm X (Death Date)

  • Liquidice5 14:24, 15 February 2006 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:32, 20 February 2006 (UTC) (but might rank it higher on his birth-date)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 20:29, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:35, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I believe in recognizing every human being as a human being, neither white, black, brown nor red. When you are dealing with humanity as one family, there's no question of integration or intermarriage. It's just one human being marrying another human being, or one human being living around and with another human being. ~ Malcolm X (Death Date)

  • Liquidice5 14:24, 15 February 2006 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:32, 20 February 2006 (UTC) (but even when there are very good quotes available, I generally prefer to use quotes on people's date of birth rather than their date of death).
  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:29, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:35, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Without Art, we should have no notion of the sacred; without Science, we should always worship false gods. ~ W. H. Auden

  • 3 Kalki 06:44, 20 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 4 InvisibleSun 21:45, 20 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:35, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

All I have is a voice
To undo the folded lie,
The romantic lie in the brain
Of the sensual man-in-the-street
And the lie of Authority
Whose buildings grope the sky:
There is no such thing as the State
And no one exists alone;
Hunger allows no choice
To the citizen or the police;
We must love one another or die.

~ W. H. Auden ~

  • 3 Kalki 06:44, 20 February 2007 (UTC) (pretty much equal in my esteem with the final lines below, but I am giving them the edge for today)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:45, 20 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:35, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

We are beginning to see the influence of dream upon reality and reality upon dream. ~ Anaïs Nin

  • 3 Kalki 18:58, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:29, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:35, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The creative personality never remains fixed on the first world it discovers. It never resigns itself to anything. ~ Anaïs Nin

  • 3 Kalki 18:58, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:29, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:35, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

By mourning tongues
The death of the poet was kept from his poems.
~ W. H. Auden

  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:29, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 20:35, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:35, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Follow, poet, follow right
To the bottom of the night,
With your unconstraining voice
Still persuade us to rejoice;

With the farming of a verse
Make a vineyard of the curse,
Sing of human unsuccess
In a rapture of distress;

In the deserts of the heart
Let the healing fountains start,
In the prison of his days
Teach the free man how to praise.
~ W. H. Auden

  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:29, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 20:35, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:35, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

When I consider others I can easily believe that their bodies express their personalities and that the two are inseparable. But it is impossible for me not to feel that my body is other than I, that I inhabit it like a house, and that my face is a mask which, with or without my consent, conceals my real nature from others. ~ W. H. Auden

  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:29, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 20:35, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:35, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The basic stimulus to the intelligence is doubt, a feeling that the meaning of an experience is not self-evident. ~ W. H. Auden

  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:29, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 20:35, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:35, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Whatever the field under discussion, those who engage in debate must not only believe in each other's good faith, but also in their capacity to arrive at the truth. ~ W. H. Auden

  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:29, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 20:35, 20 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:35, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Our votes must go together with our guns. After all, any vote we shall have, shall have been the product of the gun. The gun which produces the vote should remain its security officer – its guarantor. The people's votes and the people's guns are always inseparable twins. ~ Robert Mugabe (born February 21)

  • 2 because artillery and weaponry is needed just as much as the people's votes, national unity and national protection go hand in hand. Zarbon 04:48, 27 April 2008 (UTC)

It may be necessary to use methods other than constitutional ones. ~ Robert Mugabe (born February 21)

  • 2 because sometimes drastic situations may call for drastic measures. Zarbon 04:48, 27 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom. ~ Isaac Asimov
  • selected by Kalki
2005
All see, and most admire, the glare which hovers round the external trappings of elevated office. To me there is nothing in it, beyond the lustre which may be reflected from its connection with a power of promoting human felicity. ~ George Washington (born 22 February 1732)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
I hold the maxim no less applicable to public than to private affairs, that honesty is always the best policy. ~ George Washington (born 22 February 1732)
  • proposed by Sir John Alexander Macdonald
2007
Promote... as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened. ~ George Washington
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
Life is short and truth works far and lives long: let us speak the truth. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

There is no good in arguing with the inevitable. The only argument available with an east wind is to put on your overcoat. ~ James Russell Lowell

  • 3 Kalki 20:02, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:38, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:38, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Truth, after all, wears a different face to everybody, and it would be too tedious to wait till all were agreed. She is said to lie at the bottom of a well, for the very reason, perhaps, that whoever looks down in search of her sees his own image at the bottom, and is persuaded not only that he has seen the goddess, but that she is far better looking than he had imagined. ~ James Russell Lowell

  • 3 Kalki 20:02, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:38, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:38, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Who speaks the truth stabs Falsehood to the heart. ~ James Russell Lowell

  • 3 Kalki 20:02, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 22:38, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:38, 22 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Lyle 15:54, 18 November 2008 (UTC)

Every man takes the limits of his own field of vision for the limits of the world. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer

  • 3 Kalki 20:02, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:38, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:38, 22 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Lyle 15:54, 18 November 2008 (UTC)

Every child is in a way a genius; and every genius is in a way a child. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer

  • 3 Kalki 20:02, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:38, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:38, 22 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Lyle 15:54, 18 November 2008 (UTC)

Of all the animosities which have existed among mankind, those which are caused by difference of sentiments in religion appear to be the most inveterate and distressing, and ought most to be deprecated. ~ George Washington

  • 3 Kalki 20:02, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:38, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:38, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The Citizens of the United States of America have a right to applaud themselves for giving to Mankind examples of an enlarged and liberal policy: a policy worthy of imitation. All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no more that toleration is spoken of, as if it was by the indulgence of one class of people that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights. For happily the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens in giving it on all occasions their effectual support. ~ George Washington

  • 3 Kalki 20:02, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:38, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:38, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Democratical States must always feel before they can see: it is this that makes their Governments slow, but the people will be right at last. ~ George Washington

  • 3 Kalki 20:02, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:38, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:38, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Opinion is like a pendulum and obeys the same law. If it goes past the centre of gravity on one side, it must go a like distance on the other; and it is only after a certain time that it finds the true point at which it can remain at rest. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer

  • 3 Lyle 15:51, 18 November 2008 (UTC)

Hatred comes from the heart; contempt from the head; and neither feeling is quite within our control. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer

  • 4 Lyle 15:54, 18 November 2008 (UTC)


2004
Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. ~ Dr. Seuss
  • selected by Kalki
2005
If you're going to be crazy, you have to get paid for it or else you're going to be locked up. ~ Hunter S. Thompson (recent death)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
Man is always something more than what he knows of himself. He is not what he is simply once and for all, but is a process... ~ Karl Jaspers (born 23 February 1883)
  • proposed by Kalki
2007
The theory of democratic government is not that the will of the people is always right, but rather that normal human beings of average intelligence will, if given a chance, learn the right and best course by bitter experience. ~ W. E. B. Du Bois
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2008
There is but one coward on earth, and that is the coward that dare not know. ~ W. E. B. Du Bois
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2009

Suggestions

We cannot avoid conflict, conflict with society, other individuals and with oneself. Conflicts may be the sources of defeat, lost life and a limitation of our potentiality but they may also lead to greater depth of living and the birth of more far-reaching unities, which flourish in the tensions that engender them. ~ Karl Jaspers (date of birth)

  • 4 Kalki 00:23, 23 February 2008 (UTC) (UTC) 3 Kalki 23:32, 20 February 2006 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:15, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:45, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The function of the university is not simply to teach bread-winning, or to furnish teachers for the public schools or to be a centre of polite society; it is, above all, to be the organ of that fine adjustment between real life and the growing knowledge of life, an adjustment which forms the secret of civilization. ~ W. E. B. Du Bois

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:15, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 ~ Kalki 06:14, 22 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:45, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Herein lies the tragedy of the age: not that men are poor,— all men know something of poverty; not that men are wicked — who is good? not that men are ignorant, — what is Truth? Nay, but that men know so little of men. ~ W. E. B. Du Bois

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:15, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 ~ Kalki 06:14, 22 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:45, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

How shall Integrity face Oppression? What shall Honesty do in the face of Deception, Decency in the face of Insult, Self-Defense before Blows? How shall Desert and Accomplishment meet Despising, Detraction, and Lies? What shall Virtue do to meet Brute Force? There are so many answers and so contradictory; and such differences for those on the one hand who meet questions similar to this once a year or once a decade, and those who face them hourly and daily. ~ W. E. B. Du Bois

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:15, 21 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 ~ Kalki 06:14, 22 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:45, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
Ethics and Aesthetics are one. ~ Ludwig Wittgenstein
  • selected by Kalki
2005
We think basically you watch television to turn your brain off, and you work on your computer when you want to turn your brain on. ~ Steve Jobs (born 24 February 1955)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
Our armament must be adequate to the needs, but our faith is not primarily in these machines of defense but in ourselves. ~ Chester W. Nimitz (born 24 February 1885)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
Terrible is the day when each sees his soul naked, stripped of all veil; that dear soul which he cannot change or discard, and which is so irreparably his. ~ George A. Moore
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2008
When you're young, you look at television and think, There's a conspiracy. The networks have conspired to dumb us down. But when you get a little older, you realize that's not true. The networks are in business to give people exactly what they want. That's a far more depressing thought. Conspiracy is optimistic! You can shoot the bastards! We can have a revolution! But the networks are really in business to give people what they want. It's the truth. ~ Steve Jobs (born 24 February 1955)
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

A man travels the world over in search of what he needs and returns home to find it. ~ George A. Moore (born February 24, 1852)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 06:31, 23 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 20:07, 23 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 because this is extremely true. One seeks the planet only to return and find his heart belongs at home. I love this one. Zarbon 22:48, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

After all there is but one race — humanity. ~ George A. Moore

  • 3 InvisibleSun 06:31, 23 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 20:07, 23 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:48, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The mind petrifies if a circle be drawn around it, and it can hardly be denied that dogma draws a circle round the mind. ~ George A. Moore

  • 3 Kalki 20:07, 23 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:41, 23 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:48, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The lot of critics is to be remembered by what they failed to understand. ~ George A. Moore

  • 3 Kalki 20:07, 23 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:41, 23 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:48, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
An amicable divorce is like a ventilated condom; it just doesn't work. ~ Rita Rudner
  • selected by IP 172.161.111.38
2005
Little darling,
I feel that ice is slowly melting.
Little darling,
It seems like years since it's been clear.
Here comes the sun...
Here comes the sun,
And I say
It's alright.

~ George Harrison ~
(born 25 February 1943, according to death certificate)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
That so many writers have been prepared to accept a kind of martyrdom is the best tribute that flesh can pay to the living spirit of man as expressed in his literature. One cannot doubt that the martyrdom will continue to be gladly embraced. To some of us, the wresting of beauty out of language is the only thing in the world that matters. ~ Anthony Burgess (born 25 February 1917)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
I look at the world and I notice it’s turning.
While my guitar gently weeps.
With every mistake we must surely be learning,
Still my guitar gently weeps.

~ George Harrison ~
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
Every intelligent child is an amateur anthropologist. The first thing such a child notices is that adults don't make sense. ~ John Leonard (born 25 February 1939)
  • proposed by InvisibleSun
2009

Suggestions

Do what you want to do
And go where you're going to
Think for yourself
'Cause I won't be there with you.

~ George Harrison ~

  • 3 Kalki 09:27, 22 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:19, 24 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:51, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

War is so terrible that it desperately requires any limits anyone can agree on, any gesture toward dignity, any mitigation suggesting civilized scruple. There isn’t even persuasive evidence that torture makes its victims tell their secrets, instead of saying whatever we want to hear. ~ John Leonard

  • 3 InvisibleSun 15:58, 16 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:09, 24 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:51, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The books we love, love us back. In gratitude, we should promise not to cheat on them — not to pretend we're better than they are; not to use them as target practice, agit-prop, trampolines, photo ops or stalking horses; not to sell out scruple to that scratch-and-sniff info-tainment racket in which we posture in front of experience instead of engaging it. ~ John Leonard

  • 3 InvisibleSun 15:58, 16 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:09, 24 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:51, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

When the state murders, it assumes an authority I refuse to concede: the authority of perfect knowledge in final things. ~ John Leonard

  • 3 InvisibleSun 15:58, 16 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:09, 24 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:51, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

To be capable of embarrassment is the beginning of moral consciousness. Honor grows from qualms. ~ John Leonard

  • 4 InvisibleSun 15:58, 16 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:09, 24 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:51, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

A well-fought defeat is worth more than a casual victory. ~ José de San Martín (born February 25)

  • 3 because I love this one. For to lose in style is better than to win without enthralling magnificence. Zarbon 17:12, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

More noise does a single man yelling, than a hundred who remain quiet. ~ José de San Martín (born February 25)

  • 3 Zarbon 17:12, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
An interesting thing has happened since San Francisco started granting marriage licenses to same-sex couples: my marriage is just fine! Even though there are thousands of gay and lesbian couples affirming their love for and commitment to each other, my marriage — my affirmation of love and commitment to (my wife) — isn't threatened at all. As a matter of fact, the only people who can really "threaten" my marriage are the two of us. ~ Wil Wheaton
  • selected by IP 172.143.235.101
2005
The true division of humanity is between those who live in light and those who live in darkness. Our aim must be to diminish the number of the latter and increase the number of the former. That is why we demand education and knowledge. ~ Victor Hugo (born 26 February 1802)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
Sure, ninety percent of science fiction is crud. That's because ninety percent of everything is crud. ~ Theodore Sturgeon (born 26 February 1918)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
To put everything in balance is good, to put everything in harmony is better. ~ Victor Hugo
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
A man is not idle, because he is absorbed in thought. There is a visible labour and there is an invisible labour. ~ Victor Hugo in Les Misérables
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

The need of the immaterial is the most deeply rooted of all needs. One must have bread; but before bread, one must have the ideal. ~ Victor Hugo

  • 3 Kalki 09:51, 22 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 05:05, 25 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Zarbon 22:52, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
It must be so humiliating to have such a public break-up. ~ Ellen DeGeneres to Justin Timberlake
  • selected by IP 172.152.255.195
2005
The writer is delegated to declare and to celebrate man's proven capacity for greatness of heart and spirit — for gallantry in defeat — for courage, compassion and love. In the endless war against weakness and despair, these are the bright rally-flags of hope and of emulation. I hold that a writer who does not passionately believe in the perfectibility of man, has no dedication nor any membership in literature. ~ John Steinbeck (born 27 February 1902)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
Tell me not, in mournful numbers,
"Life is but an empty dream!"
For the soul is dead that slumbers,
And things are not what they seem.

~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (born 27 February 1807)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
Lives of great men all remind us
We can make our lives sublime,
And departing, leave behind us
Footprints on the sands of time.

Footprints, that perhaps another,
Sailing o'er life's solemn main,
A forlorn and shipwrecked brother,
Seeing, shall take heart again.

Let us, then, be up and doing.
With a heart for any fate;
Still achieving, still pursuing,
Learn to labor and to wait.

~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow ~

  • proposed by Kalki
2008
The heights by great men reached and kept
Were not attained by sudden flight,
But they, while their companions slept,
Were toiling upward in the night.

~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow ~
  • proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

In this sign, conquer. ~ Dream statement to Constantine I (born this day)

  • 3 Kalki 18:54, 24 February 2007 (UTC) Though I might prefer to use this on 28 October the date of the Battle of Milvian Bridge before which Constantine is said to have had his vision and dream. We also don't have a page on him yet, and I will probably create one by then. A more familiar and poetic but less precise variant translation of the Greek and Latin renderings is : "In this sign you shall conquer."
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:57, 26 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:54, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

It seems to me that if you or I must choose between two courses of thought or action, we should remember our dying and try so to live that our death brings no pleasure on the world. ~ John Steinbeck

  • 3 Kalki 18:55, 24 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:57, 26 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:54, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Turn, turn, my wheel! All things must change
To something new, to something strange
...
~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow ~

  • 3 Kalki 18:54, 24 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:57, 26 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:54, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Life is real! Life is earnest!
And the grave is not its goal;
Dust thou art, to dust returnest,
Was not spoken of the soul.

~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow ~

  • 3 Kalki 18:54, 24 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:57, 26 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:54, 22 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much. ~ Oscar Wilde
  • selected by Kalki
2005
Of all our infirmities, the most savage is to despise our being. ~ Michel de Montaigne (born 28 February 1533)
  • selected by Kalki
2006
If you want to have good ideas you must have many ideas. Most of them will be wrong, and what you have to learn is which ones to throw away. ~ Linus Pauling (born 28 February 1901)
  • selected by Kalki
2007
Near the snow, near the sun, in the highest fields,
See how these names are feted in the waving grass
And by the streamers of the white cloud
And whispers of the wind in the listening sky.
The names of those who in their lives fought for life,
Who wore at their hearts the fire's centre.
Born of the sun, they travelled a short while toward the sun
And left the vivid air signed with their honour.

~ Stephen Spender ~
(born 28 February 1909)
  • proposed by Kalki
2008
The best defense against usurpatory government is an assertive citizenry. ~ William F. Buckley, Jr. (recent death)
  • selected by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

Man will gather knowledge no matter what the consequences – and we cannot predict what they will be. ~ Linus Pauling

  • 2 because man always tries to understand and obtain knowledge. Zarbon 05:27, 1 May 2008 (UTC)

The greatest thing in the world is to know how to belong to oneself. ~ Michel de Montaigne

  • 3 because it is easy to be controlled by others. Zarbon 05:36, 1 May 2008 (UTC)

The easy, gentle, and sloping path...is not the path of true virtue. It demands a rough and thorny road. ~ Michel de Montaigne

  • 3 because what is easy isn't always remarkable...or as Montaigne puts it...virtuous. Zarbon 05:36, 1 May 2008 (UTC)

When I play with my cat, who knows if I am not a pastime to her more than she is to me? ~ Michel de Montaigne

  • 3 because power is in the eye of the beholder. And to the cat, the master might be under its control. This is actually a rather interesting view. Zarbon 05:36, 1 May 2008 (UTC)

A man must be a little mad if he does not want to be even more stupid. ~ Michel de Montaigne

  • 3 because madness is preferable to stupidity. At least to me it is. Zarbon 05:36, 1 May 2008 (UTC)

Let us give Nature a chance; she knows her business better than we do. ~ Michel de Montaigne

  • 3 because the personification of Nature is in essence a good idea. And to say that nature finds a way...the course of nature, so to speak, makes this quote worthwhile. Zarbon 05:36, 1 May 2008 (UTC)


2004
Just because it's old doesn't mean you have to read it. ~ "Jolene Sugarbaker, the Trailer Park Queen" as portrayed by Jayson Saffer.
  • selected by IP 172.152.110.22
2008
God bless the King! (I mean our faith's defender!)
God bless! (No harm in blessing) the Pretender.
But who Pretender is, and who is King,
God bless us all! That's quite another thing!

~ John Byrom ~ (born 29 February 1692)
  • selected by Kalki
2012

Suggestions


Ranking system:

4 : Excellent - should definitely be used. (Perhaps, at most, only one quote per day should be ranked thus by any user, as to avoid confusions.)
3 : Very Good - strong desire to see it used.
2 : Good - some desire to see it used.
1 : Acceptable - but with no particular desire to see it used.
0 : Not acceptable - not appropriate for use as a quote of the day.
Last modified on 8 January 2009, at 02:08