Daw Aung San Suu Kyi

From Quotes
To live lightheartedly but not recklessly; to be gay without being boisterous; to be courageous without being bold; to show trust and cheerful resignation without fatalism—this is the art of living.
Jean De La Fontaine
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Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is the democractically elected Prime Minister of the country of Burma. She was prevented from assuming power by the military junta currently in control. Despite years of imprisonment and house arrest and great personal suffering she has maintained a policy of non-violent opposition. She was awarded, in absentia, the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize, the 1990 Sakharov Prize (human rights prize of the European Parliament) and the 1990 Rafto Human Rights Prize. For more on her story see Daw Aung San Suu Kyi pages.

Quotes

"It is not power that corrupts but fear. Fear of losing power corrupts those who wield it and fear of the scourge of power corrupts those who are subject to it. Most Burmese are familiar with the four a-gati, the four kinds of corruption. Chanda-gati, corruption induced by desire, is deviation from the right path in pursuit of bribes or for the sake of those one loves. Dosa-gati is taking the wrong path to spite those against whom one bears ill will, and moga-gati is aberration due to ignorance. But perhaps the worst of the four is bhaya-gati, for not only does bhaya, fear, stifle and slowly destroy all sense of right and wrong, it so often lies at the root of the other three kinds of corruption. Just as chanda-gati, when not the result of sheer avarice, can be caused by fear of want or fear of losing the goodwill of those one loves, so fear of being surpassed, humiliated or injured in some way can provide the impetus for ill will. And it would be difficult to dispel ignorance unless there is freedom to pursue the truth unfettered by fear. With so close a relationship between fear and corruption it is little wonder that in any society where fear is rife corruption in all forms becomes deeply entrenched."