English spelling mnemonics

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Here are some English mnemonics related to spelling.

A rule of English spelling (there are a great many exceptions unless you use the last version in the list below):

  • I before E, except after C, or when sounded like A as in neighbor or weigh.
  • I before E, except after C, or when sounded like A as in neighbor or weigh, and except seize and seizure, weird, height, and either, their and neither.
  • I before E, except after C -- don't we live in a weird society? Spelling is a weird science.
  • I before E, except after C, or in "neighbor" or "weigh," when EI says A.
  • I before E, except after C, or when sounded like A as in neighbor or weigh, or on weekends, and holidays, and all throughout May, and you'll always be wrong no matter what you say!
  • I before E, except after C, and in weird and Budweiser.
  • I before E, except after C, whenever the vowel rhymes with 'Eeeeeeee!'

How to spell the word mnemonics :

  • Mnemonics Now Erase Man's Oldest Nemesis, Insufficient Cerebral Storage

Argument or arguement?

  • I lost an 'e' in an argument

Remembering to spell "cemetery" with three e's:

  • She cried "eee!" as she passed the cemetery.

Friend or Freind?

  • Friend to the end
  • You wouldn't want to FRI the END of your FRIEND

To spell "rhythm":

  • Rhythm Has Your Two Hips Moving
  • Rock Hard, You Two Headed Monster/Musician
  • Robin Hood Yelled To His Men

To spell "Because"

  • Big Elephants Can Always Use Small Elephants.
  • Big Elephants Can Always Understand Small Elephants.
  • Big Elephants Can Always Upset Smaller Elephants.

To spell "necessary":

  • Never Eat Crisps, Eat Salad Sandwiches, And Remain Young!
  • One Collar, two Socks (ie. one C and two S's)
  • It is NECESSARY for a shirt to have one Collar, and two Sleeves (ie. one C and two S's)

To remember the number of C's in necessary and success:

  • Only one C is necessary, but use two for success.

To spell "arithmetic":

  • A Rat In The House Might Eat The Ice Cream
  • Said in England during the 1970s, but not politically correct now: A Red Indian Thought He Might Eat Toffee In Church

To spell "Mississippi":

  • Say to yourself "M-I-S, S-I-S, S-I-P, P-I" (try it - it will make more sense than seeing it written down! It has a rhythm to it).
  • A popular children's method is a rhythm of breaking the word up into groups. After the starting M, it's 'i' followed by 's' twice and then once by 'p': M ISS ISS IPP I (trying saying it outloud, stressing the Is).
  • Say to yourself: "Mrs M, Mrs I, Mrs S S I, Mrs S S I, Mrs P P I, Mississippi".
  • M i crooked letter, crooked letter, i, crooked letter, crooked letter, i, hump back, hump back, i.

In N. Wales, where people from Bangor typically say "i"(aye) at the end of every expression e.g. "know what I mean i?" Someone from Bangor says, M aye, double S aye, double S aye, double P aye, (in a Welsh(Bangor)/Liverpudian accent !)

  • Similar to previous methods, break it into letter groups, this one can be said in a sing-song way: "M and an I and a S S I and a S S I and a P P I"
  • As in the Bobby Gentry song, Mississippi Delta, you can sing it: "M - I - double S - I - double S - I - double P - I"

To spell "Londonderry":

  • Say "L-O-N-D, O-N-D, E-R-R-Y". Ensure that the Os are stressed, i.e. "Ell-OH-en-dee"

To spell "Wednesday":

  • WE Do Not Eat Soup DAY or Wed-nes-day

To spell "difficulty"

  • "Mrs. D, Mrs. I, Mrs. FFI, Mrs. C, Mrs. U, Mrs. LTY"

(used in Matilda by Roald Dahl)

To spell "separate" Use the story: An old lady had a dog named Sep. One day she saw a rat. The lady yelled, "Sep, a rat! E!"

To spell "Together:"

  • We went to get her.

To remember the difference between "stationary" and "stationery": "stationery" has an e like envelope, which is what stationery goes into. Stationary (not movable) has an "a" like st"a"y, as in if it is station"a"ry, it will st"a"y. Alternative words include pen is stationery and a car is stationary.

To remember the difference between "desert" and "dessert":

  • Dessert has two S's, which stand for Strawberry Shortcake, two Scoops of ice-cream, or So Sweet.
  • Dessert has two S's, which stand for strawberries and sugar, while there is nothing in the desert but sand.
  • I'd rather have two desserts than two deserts. (Two S's)
  • Dessert has two S's because you always want seconds.
  • The Desert is too dry to grow more than one S.

Desserts is stressed backwards.

An easy way to remember tomorrow is "Tom or row"

Phonetics

The manners of articulation:

  • Stop Fooling Around Now, Learn Good Voicing
    • Stop, Fricative, Affricate, Nasal, Liquid, Glide, Vowel

English vowels:

  • Six short vowels - that pen is not much good
  • Six long vowels - pa may we all go too