February 7

From Quotes
Happiness is a sunbeam which may pass through a thousand bosoms without losing a particle of its original ray; nay, when it strikes on a kindred heart, like the converged light on a mirror, it reflects itself with redoubled brightness. It is not perfected till it is shared.
Jane Porter
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Quotes of the day from previous years:
2005
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way — in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only. ~ Charles Dickens in A Tale of Two Cities (born 7 February 1812)
2006
He judged it not fit to determine anything rashly; and seemed to doubt whether those different forms of religion might not all come from God, who might inspire man in a different manner, and be pleased with this variety; he therefore thought it indecent and foolish for any man to threaten and terrify another to make him believe what did not appear to him to be true. ~ Thomas More (born 7 February 1478)
2007
Throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people we most despise. ~ Charles Dickens
2008

Suggestions

For men use, if they have an evil turn, to write it in marble: and whoso doth us a good turn we write it in dust. ~ Thomas More (born February 7, 1478)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 16:45, 6 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:11, 6 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

There are many pleasant fictions of the law in constant operation, but there is not one so pleasant or practically humorous as that which supposes every man to be of equal value in its impartial eye, and the benefits of all laws to be equally attainable by all men, without the smallest reference to the furniture of their pockets. ~ Charles Dickens (born February 7, 1812)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 16:45, 6 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:11, 6 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Zarbon 21:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Here's the rule for bargains — 'Do other men, for they would do you.' That's the true business precept. ~ Charles Dickens

  • 3 InvisibleSun 16:45, 6 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:11, 6 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Charity begins at home, and justice begins next door. ~ Charles Dickens

  • 3 InvisibleSun 16:45, 6 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:11, 6 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

"Business!" cried the Ghost, wringing its hands again. "Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence, were, all, my business. The dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!" ~ Charles Dickens

  • 3 InvisibleSun 16:45, 6 February 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:11, 6 February 2008 (UTC) (but I would much prefer to use this sometime in the Christmas season, perhaps on the anniversary of the publication of A Christmas Carol)
  • 1 Zarbon 21:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

A man acts suitably to his nature, when he conquers his enemy in such a way as that no other creature but a man could be capable of, and that is by the strength of his understanding. ~ Thomas More

  • 4 Kalki 23:11, 6 February 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)