Quotes:Quote of the day/May

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April << May 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 >> June

This page lists quote of the day proposals specifically for dates in the month of May, and quotes proposed should ideally have some relation to the day, or persons born on it, though sometimes exceptions can be made, usually for notable quotes that relate to recent events, such as the death of prominent individuals. Developing ideas of people or works to quote on specific days can be explored through the Wikipedia page: List of historical anniversaries. The numeric section heading of each date is also a direct link to the Wikipedia list of births, deaths, and other events which occured on that date.

See also: May 2008

Ranking system:

4 : Excellent - should definitely be used.
3 : Very Good - strong desire to see it used.
2 : Good - some desire to see it used.
1 : Acceptable - but with no particular desire to see it used.
0 : Not acceptable - not appropriate for use as a quote of the day.

2004
The month of May was come, when every lusty heart beginneth to blossom, and to bring forth fruit; for like as herbs and trees bring forth fruit and flourish in May, in likewise every lusty heart that is in any manner a lover, springeth and flourisheth in lusty deeds. For it giveth unto all lovers courage, that lusty month of May. ~ Sir Thomas Malory
2005
"DON'T PANIC"
~ Douglas Adams in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
2006
I react pragmatically. Where the market works, I'm for that. Where the government is necessary, I'm for that. I'm deeply suspicious of somebody who says, "I'm in favor of privatization," or, "I'm deeply in favor of public ownership." I'm in favor of whatever works in the particular case. ~ John Kenneth Galbraith (recent death)
2007
A man must be excessively stupid, as well as uncharitable, who believes that there is no virtue but on his own side, and that there are not men as honest as himself who may differ from him in political principles. ~ Joseph Addison
2008
What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to the human soul. ~ Joseph Addison
2009

Suggestions

Good nature is more agreeable in conversation than wit, and gives a certain air to the countenance which is more amiable than beauty. ~ Joseph Addison (born May 1, 1672)


The man who will live above his present circumstances is in great danger of living in a little time much beneath them; or as the Italian proverb runs, "The man who lives by hope, will die by hunger." ~ Joseph Addison

  • 3 InvisibleSun 03:59, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 13:12, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 because hope alone is not enough to live, especially under difficult circumstances. Zarbon 04:50, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

Nature does nothing without purpose or uselessly. ~ Joseph Addison

  • 3 Kalki 14:00, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 18:22, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 4 Aphaia 19:24, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 because what happens, happens for reason. Zarbon 04:50, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men. ~ Joseph Addison

  • 3 Kalki 14:00, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 18:22, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Aphaia 19:24, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 04:50, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

A man's first care should be to avoid the reproaches of his own heart, his next to escape the censures of the world. ~ Joseph Addison

  • 3 Kalki 14:00, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 18:22, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Aphaia 19:24, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 04:50, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

When an angel by divine command
With rising tempests shakes a guilty land,
Such as of late o'er pale Britannia past,
Calm and serene he drives the furious blast;
And, pleas'd th' Almighty's orders to perform,
Rides in the whirlwind, and directs the storm.

~ Joseph Addison ~

OR

When an angel by divine command with rising tempests shakes a guilty land... calm and serene he drives the furious blast; and, pleas'd th' Almighty's orders to perform, rides in the whirlwind, and directs the storm. ~ Joseph Addison

  • 3 Kalki 14:00, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 in verse form. - InvisibleSun 18:22, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 in verse form. Aphaia 19:24, 30 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 in either form Zarbon 04:50, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

On you, my lord, with anxious fear I wait,
And from your judgment must expect my fate.
~ Joseph Addison (born May 1, 1672)

  • 3 because as the main agenda of Greek philosophy has always been, one can not escape from one's own fate, especially when one does not know one's own fate to begin with. Beautiful. Zarbon 15:08, 28 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 20:03, 30 April 2008 (UTC)

Arguments out of a pretty mouth are unanswerable. ~ Joseph Addison (born May 1, 1672)

  • 2 because sometimes it is truly hard to reply to a woman of sheer beauty. Zarbon 15:08, 28 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 20:03, 30 April 2008 (UTC)

Better to die ten thousand deaths,
Than wound my honour.
~ Joseph Addison (born May 1, 1672)

  • 4 because dying is nothing compared to destroying or tainting one's honor, and moreso reputation. Zarbon 15:08, 28 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:03, 30 April 2008 (UTC)

How beautiful is death, when earn'd by virtue!
Who would not be that youth? What pity is it
That we can die but once to serve our country!
~ Joseph Addison (born May 1, 1672)

  • 3 because true virtue and loyalty comes from service to one's country. Zarbon 15:08, 28 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:03, 30 April 2008 (UTC)

In doing what we ought we deserve no praise,
Because it is our duty.
~ Joseph Addison (born May 1, 1672)

  • 3 because this is very true. It is a gift in itself to do one's duty, and rightly so. Zarbon 15:08, 28 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:03, 30 April 2008 (UTC)

My death and life,
My bane and antidote, are both before me.
~ Joseph Addison (born May 1, 1672)

  • 3 because in some instances, everything flashes before one's eyes, life and death alike, before the end. The comparison of bane and suffering to that of life and the antidote expressed in the form of death is also magnificent. Zarbon 15:08, 28 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:03, 30 April 2008 (UTC)

I shall endeavor to enliven morality with wit, and to temper wit with morality. ~ Joseph Addison (born May 1, 1672)

  • 3 because there is a healthy balance expressed here. I'd go along moreso with tempering the wit with morality though. Zarbon 15:08, 28 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:03, 30 April 2008 (UTC)

Love alone is capable of uniting living beings in such a way as to complete and fulfill them, for it alone takes them and joins them by what is deepest in themselves. All we need is to imagine our ability to love developing until it embraces the totality of men and the earth. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

  • 3 Fossil 22:03, 7 November 2008 (UTC)

We only have to look around us to see how complexity and psychic temperature are still rising: and rising no longer on the scale of the individual but now on that of the planet. This indication is so familiar to us that we cannot but recognize the objective, experiential, reality of a transformation of the planet as a whole. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

  • 3 Fossil 22:03, 7 November 2008 (UTC)

The day will come when, after harnessing space, the winds, the tides, gravitation, we shall harness for God the energies of love. And, on that day, for the second time in the history of the world, man will have discovered fire. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

  • 3 Fossil 22:03, 7 November 2008 (UTC)


2004
I would rather live in a world where my life is surrounded by mystery than live in a world so small that my mind could comprehend it. ~ Harry Emerson Fosdick
2005
You know more than you think you do. ~ Benjamin Spock (born 2 May 1903)
2006
We are near waking when we dream that we dream. ~ Novalis (born 2 May 1772)
2007
Love works magic.
It is the final purpose
Of the world story,
The Amen of the universe.

~ Novalis ~
2008
Philosophy can bake no bread; but she can procure for us God, Freedom, Immortality. ~ Novalis
2009

Suggestions

In automobile terms, the child supplies the power but the parents have to do the steering. ~ Benjamin Spock (born 2 May 1903)

  • 3 because all children need some form of guidance. Tarzan and Mowgli have nice stories but they aren't the best characteristic transformations to be had. Zarbon 15:22, 28 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:07, 1 May 2008 (UTC)

Friends, the soil is poor, we must sow seeds in plenty for us to garner even modest harvests. ~ Novalis (born 2 May 1772)

  • 2 because it is best to be prepared so that when a disappointment comes along, it will not overwhelm one to an unparalleled extent. Zarbon 15:22, 28 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:07, 1 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:07, 2 May 2008 (UTC)

Out of a mob a society has developed, chaos has been transformed into a manifold world. ~ Novalis (born 2 May 1772)

  • 2 because a transformation can be made, even from the state of chaos. Zarbon 15:22, 28 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 07:07, 1 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:07, 2 May 2008 (UTC) but extended to start with "Before abstraction everything is one, but one like chaos; after abstraction everything is united again, but this union is a free binding of autonomous, self-determined beings."

Realists are, as a rule, only men in the rut of routine who are incapable of transcending a narrow circle of antiquated notions. ~ Theodor Herzl (born May 2, 1860)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:07, 1 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 because being a realist is fine, but exceeding to an extent of not seeing anything else, to a degree of narrowness isn't warranted. Zarbon 04:37, 2 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:07, 2 May 2008 (UTC) though I believe his comments refer to those who are normally called "realists" because they focus upon the physical processes or what are normally called practical affairs, but he also gives some hints of the "idealism" which must be included within the scope of a higher "realism."

It is impossible to enjoy idling thoroughly unless one has plenty of work to do. There is no fun in doing nothing when you have nothing to do. Wasting time is merely an occupation then, and a most exhausting one. Idleness, like kisses, to be sweet must be stolen. ~ Jerome K. Jerome (born May 2, 1859)


True anarchy is the generative element of religion. Out of the annihilation of every positive element she lifts her gloriously radiant countenance as the founder of a new world... ~ Novalis

  • 3 Kalki 16:07, 2 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 06:56, 8 May 2008 (UTC)

Moral Action is that great and only Experiment, in which all riddles of the most manifold appearances explain themselves. Whoso understands it, and in rigid sequence of Thought can lay it open, is forever master of Nature. ~ Novalis

  • 3 Kalki 16:07, 2 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 06:56, 8 May 2008 (UTC)

Language is the dynamics of the spiritual realm. One word of command moves armies; the word Liberty entire nations. ~ Novalis

  • 3 Kalki 16:07, 2 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 06:56, 8 May 2008 (UTC)

We are so bound together that no man can labor for himself alone. Each blow he strikes in his own behalf helps to mold the Universe. ~ Jerome K. Jerome (born 2 May 1859)

  • 3 Kalki 17:12, 2 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 06:56, 8 May 2008 (UTC)
2004
In nature's infinite book of secrecy a little I can read. ~ William Shakespeare in Antony and Cleopatra
2005
It ought to be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things. ~ Niccolò Machiavelli (born 3 May 1469)
2006
Education is what you get when you read the fine print; experience is what you get when you don't. ~ Pete Seeger (born 3 May 1919)
2007
The easiest way to avoid wrong notes is to never open your mouth and sing. What a mistake that would be. ~ Pete Seeger
2008
The lion cannot protect himself from traps, and the fox cannot defend himself from wolves. One must therefore be a fox to recognize traps, and a lion to frighten wolves. ~ Niccolò Machiavelli
2009

Suggestions

Whenever men are not obliged to fight from necessity, they fight from ambition; which is so powerful in human breasts, that it never leaves them no matter to what rank they rise. The reason is that nature has so created men that they are able to desire everything but are not able to attain everything: so that the desire being always greater than the acquisition, there results discontent with the possession and little satisfaction to themselves from it. ~ Niccolò Machiavelli


No enterprise is more likely to succeed than one concealed from the enemy until it is ripe for execution.
Nothing is of greater importance in time of war than in knowing how to make the best use of a fair opportunity when it is offered. ~ Niccolò Machiavelli


Few men are brave by nature, but good discipline and experience make many so.
Good order and discipline in an army are more to be depended upon than ferocity. ~ Niccolò Machiavelli

  • 3 Kalki 16:02, 23 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 05:21, 2 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Aphaia 16:02, 2 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 because this is so true. I love this concept with all my heart. Zarbon 04:52, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

It’s no accident many accuse me of conducting public affairs with my heart instead of my head. Well, what if I do? . . . Those who don’t know how to weep with their whole heart don’t know how to laugh either. ~ Golda Meir (born 3 May 1898)

2004
The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return. ~ eden ahbez
2005
Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity. ~ Horace Mann (born 4 May 1796)
2006
Sit down before fact as a little child, be prepared to give up every preconceived notion, follow humbly wherever and to whatever abysses nature leads, or you shall learn nothing. I have only begun to learn content and peace of mind since I have resolved at all risks to do this. ~ T. H. Huxley (born 4 May 1825)
2007
The life, the fortune, and the happiness of every one of us, and, more or less, of those who are connected with us, do depend upon our knowing something of the rules of a game infinitely more difficult and complicated than chess. It is a game which has been played for untold ages, every man and woman of us being one of the two players in a game of his or her own. The chessboard is the world, the pieces are the phenomena of the universe, the rules of the game are what we call the laws of Nature. The player on the other side is hidden from us. We know that his play is always fair, just, and patient. But also we know, to our cost, that he never overlooks a mistake, or makes the smallest allowance for ignorance. ~ T. H. Huxley
2008
A teacher who is attempting to teach without inspiring the pupil with a desire to learn is hammering cold iron. ~ Horace Mann (born May 4)
2009

Suggestions

To pity distress is but human; to relieve it is Godlike. ~ Horace Mann (born May 4)

  • 3 because everyone can feel sympathy or pity towards something. But to try and relieve it is truly remarkable. Zarbon 15:30, 28 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 20:25, 2 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 13:51, 3 May 2008 (UTC)


2004
Everything in the universe relates to the number 5, one way or another, given enough ingenuity on the part of the interpreter. ~ Principia Discordia, "The Law of Fives"
2005
Democracy is the destiny of humanity; freedom its indestructible arm. ~ Benito Juárez (Cinco de Mayo, and 05-05-05)
2006
Once you label me you negate me. ~ Søren Kierkegaard (born 5 May 1813)
2007
I see it all perfectly; there are two possible situations — one can either do this or that. My honest opinion and my friendly advice is this: do it or do not do it — you will regret both. ~ Søren Kierkegaard, Either/Or
2008
If I have ventured wrongly, very well, life then helps me with its penalty. But if I haven't ventured at all, who helps me then? ~ Søren Kierkegaard (born 5 May 1813)
2009

Suggestions

Out of love, God becomes man. He says: "See, here is what it is to be a human being. -- Søren Kierkegaard, The Sickness unto Death


When one has once fully entered the realm of love, the world — no matter how imperfect — becomes rich and beautiful, it consists solely of opportunities for love. -- Søren Kierkegaard, The Works of Love

  • 3 Aphaia 09:12, 4 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 11:27, 4 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 4 Kalki 13:15, 4 May 2008 (UTC) * 3 Kalki 15:26, 4 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 04:56, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced. -- Søren Kierkegaard

  • 3 Aphaia 09:12, 4 May 2007 (UTC)
  • Comment: I'm in the middle of finding sources for the unsourced quotes on the Kierkegaard page. This unsourced quote is one of a number of variants, including "Life is not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be lived," "Life is not mystery to be solved, but a reality to be experienced", and all the other permutations of the same. Although the quote is most frequently attributed to Kierkegaard, I haven't yet found a source for it and would hesitate to recommend it unless it was sourced. Other people are also attributed with the quote: one of them, J.J. van der Leeuw, is the only person so far to whom I can trace it, as seen here in a book dated 1928. - InvisibleSun 11:27, 4 May 2007 (UTC)
  • I HOPE it originated with Kierkegaard, because it is so widely attributed I used a variant of it already: "Life is a mystery to be lived, not a problem to be solved" on 17 August 2004. ~ Kalki 15:26, 4 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 04:56, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

Do not interrupt the flight of your soul; do not distress what is best in you; do not enfeeble your spirit with half wishes and half thoughts. Ask yourself and keep on asking until you find the answer, for one may have known something many times, acknowledged it; one may have willed something many times, attempted it — and yet, only the deep inner motion, only the heart's indescribable emotion, only that will convince you that what you have acknowledged belongs to you, that no power can take it from you — for only the truth that builds up is truth for you. -- Søren Kierkegaard, Either/Or

  • 2 Aphaia 09:12, 4 May 2007 (UTC) (afraid a bit long...)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 11:27, 4 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 15:26, 4 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 04:56, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

Do not interrupt the flight of your soul; do not distress what is best in you; do not enfeeble your spirit with half wishes and half thoughts. Ask yourself and keep on asking until you find the answer, for one may have known something many times, acknowledged it. -- Søren Kierkegaard, Either/Or

  • 3 Aphaia 09:12, 4 May 2007 (UTC) (shortened version of the above)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 11:27, 4 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 15:26, 4 May 2007 (UTC) But with a strong preference for the longer version.
  • 1 Zarbon 04:56, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it. --Karl Marx, "Theses on Feuerbach". (also born on May 5)


Sin is in itself separation from the good, but despair over sin is separation a second time. ~ Søren Kierkegaard


History is not like some individual person, which uses men to achieve its ends. History is nothing but the actions of men in pursuit of their ends. ~ Karl Marx (born May 5, 1818)


Think of the 40 years of confrontation. What is it we gained?...The old style has exposed itself: it is fruitless. ~ Sergei Akhromeyev (born May 5)

  • 3 Zarbon 06:37, 21 April 2008 (UTC)
    • Source: The New York Times, "Mr. Darman's Sermon" July 29, 1989
  • 1 This is an unsourced quote. It is also not clear what it refers to: the Cold War, presumably, but a reader shouldn't have to guess at this meaning out of context. - InvisibleSun 08:10, 4 May 2008 (UTC)

Men make their own history, but they do not make it just as they please; they do not make it under circumstances chosen by themselves, but under circumstances directly encountered, given and transmitted from the past. ~ Karl Marx (born May 5)

  • 3 because although to some degree, people do decide what steps they take, they can't decide and create the circumstances themselves...and the environmental horizons truly decipher the possibilities. Zarbon 04:02, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 08:10, 4 May 2008 (UTC)

It is the duty of the human understanding to understand that there are things which it cannot understand, and what those things are. Human understanding has vulgarly occupied itself with nothing but understanding, but if it would only take the trouble to understand itself at the same time it would simply have to posit the paradox. ~ Søren Kierkegaard

  • 3 Kalki 13:15, 4 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because the word "understand" is abused here. Zarbon 16:55, 4 May 2008 (UTC)

The presence of irony does not necessarily mean that the earnestness is excluded. Only assistant professors assume that. ~ Søren Kierkegaard

  • 3 Kalki 13:15, 4 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 16:55, 4 May 2008 (UTC)

You cannot get the truth by capturing it, only by its capturing you. ~ Søren Kierkegaard

  • 3 Kalki 13:15, 4 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 16:55, 4 May 2008 (UTC)

Poor nations which loves more freedom than motherland. ~ Henryk Sienkiewicz

  • 3 Zarbon 06:01, 12 October 2008 (UTC)
2004
That best portion of a good man's life, — His little, nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and of love. ~ William Wordsworth
2005
If you shut your door to all errors truth will be shut out. ~ Rabindranath Tagore
2006
Thinking is an experimental dealing with small quantities of energy, just as a general moves miniature figures over a map before setting his troops in action. ~ Sigmund Freud (born 6 May 1856)
2007
Who knows what beautiful and winged life, whose egg has been buried for ages under many concentric layers of woodenness in the dead dry life of society ... may unexpectedly come forth ... to enjoy its perfect summer life at last! ... such is the character of that morrow which mere lapse of time can never make to dawn. ... Only that day dawns to which we are awake. There is more day to dawn. The sun is but a morning star. ~ Henry David Thoreau in Walden (died 6 May 1862)
2008
Being entirely honest with oneself is a good exercise. ~ Sigmund Freud
2009

Suggestions

The voice of the intellect is a soft one, but it does not rest until it has gained a hearing. Ultimately, after endlessly repeated rebuffs, it succeeds. This is one of the few points in which it may be optimistic about the future of mankind, but in itself it signifies not a little. ~ Sigmund Freud (born 6 May 1856), The Future of an Illusion (1928)


Simplify, simplify. ~ Henry David Thoreau (died 6 May 1862), Walden (1854)


The unconscious is the larger circle which includes within itself the smaller circle of the conscious; everything conscious has its preliminary step in the unconscious. ~ Sigmund Freud


Man found that he was faced with the acceptance of "spiritual" forces, that is to say such forces as cannot be comprehended by the senses, particularly not by sight, and yet having undoubted, even extremely strong, effects... The idea of the soul was thus born as the spiritual principle in the individual...Now the realm of spirits had opened for man, and he was ready to endow everything in nature with the soul he had discovered in himself. ~ Sigmund Freud


Analogies prove nothing, that is quite true, but they can make one feel more at home. ~ Sigmund Freud


One might compare the relation of the ego to the id with that between a rider and his horse. The horse provides the locomotor energy, and the rider has the perogative of determining the goal and of guiding the movements of his powerful mount towards it. But all too often in the relations between the ego and the id we find a picture of the less ideal situation in which the rider is obliged to guide his horse in the direction in which it itself wants to go. ~ Sigmund Freud

  • 3 Kalki 18:58, 5 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 20:18, 5 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 because this deals somewhat with Freud's distinctions of the Id, Ego, and the missing Superego, nice one. Zarbon 05:00, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

He that has eyes to see and ears to hear may convince himself that no mortal can keep a secret. If his lips are silent, he chatters with his fingertips; betrayal oozes out of him at every pore. ~ Sigmund Freud

  • 3 because man finds a way, even if lips are sealed. Zarbon 04:14, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:13, 29 April 2008 (UTC)

Religion is an illusion and it derives its strength from the fact that it falls in with our instinctual desires. ~ Sigmund Freud

  • 3 because religion does derive its strength from the people's own instinctual desires. Whether or not it is an illusion is the question, but Freud's perspective is well said in this quote. Zarbon 04:14, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 07:13, 29 April 2008 (UTC)

One of the most obvious facts about grown-ups to a child is that they have forgotten what it is like to be a child. ~ Randall Jarrell (born May 6, 1914)


I identify myself, as always,
With something that there's something wrong with,
With something human.
~ Randall Jarrell


Soon we shall know everything the eighteenth century didn't know, and nothing it did, and it will be hard to live with us. ~ Randall Jarrell


The people who live in a Golden Age usually go around complaining how yellow everything looks. ~ Randall Jarrell


If we judge by wealth and power, our times are the best of times; if the times have made us willing to judge by wealth and power, they are the worst of times. ~ Randall Jarrell


A poem is, so to speak, a way of making you forget how you wrote it. ~ Randall Jarrell


You often feel about something in Shakespeare or Dostoevsky that nobody ever said such a thing, but it's just the sort of thing people would say if they could — is more real, in some sense, than what people do say. If you have given your imagination free rein, let things go as far as they want to go, the world they made for themselves while you watched can have, for you and later watchers, a spontaneous finality. ~ Randall Jarrell


Citizens, did you want a revolution without revolution? ~ Maximilien Robespierre (born May 6)

  • 2 because in order to have change, one must endure the many steps of revolution, so to speak. Zarbon 04:26, 3 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 04:51, 5 May 2008 (UTC)

Our revolution has made me feel the full force of the axiom that history is fiction and I am convinced that chance and intrigue have produced more heroes than genius and virtue. ~ Maximilien Robespierre (born May 6)

  • 4 because this is rather true. The heroes of time and history have been guided much by the time in which they fell or were born into...chance is truly a major factor. Zarbon 04:26, 3 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:58, 4 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 04:51, 5 May 2008 (UTC)

Death is the beginning of immortality. ~ Maximilien Robespierre (born May 6)

  • 3 because through death, one achieves the one thing one cannot achieve through living; the essence of immortality. Zarbon 04:26, 3 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 04:51, 5 May 2008 (UTC)

The secret of freedom lies in educating people, whereas the secret of tyranny is in keeping them ignorant. ~ Maximilien Robespierre (born May 6)

  • 3 because education is the key factor of freedom, and ignorance is bound to tyranny. Zarbon 04:26, 3 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:58, 4 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 04:51, 5 May 2008 (UTC)
2004
If I can stop one heart from breaking, I shall not live in vain; If I can ease one life the aching, Or cool one pain, Or help one fainting robin Unto his nest again, I shall not live in vain. ~ Emily Dickinson
2005
Where men are the most sure and arrogant, they are commonly the most mistaken, and have there given reins to passion, without that proper deliberation and suspense, which can alone secure them from the grossest absurdities. ~ David Hume (born 7 May 1711 (26 April O.S.)
2006
The meaning of the living words that come out of the experiences of great hearts can never be exhausted by any one system of logical interpretation. They have to be endlessly explained by the commentaries of individual lives, and they gain an added mystery in each new revelation. ~ Rabindranath Tagore (born 7 May 1861)
2007
Nothing appears more surprising to those, who consider human affairs with a philosophical eye, than the easiness with which the many are governed by the few; and the implicit submission, with which men resign their own sentiments and passions to those of their rulers. When we enquire by what means this wonder is effected, we shall find, that, as Force is always on the side of the governed, the governors have nothing to support them but opinion. It is therefore, on opinion only that government is founded; and this maxim extends to the most despotic and most military governments, as well as to the most free and most popular. ~ David Hume
2008
If nature has been frugal in her gifts and endowments, there is the more need of art to supply her defects. If she has been generous and liberal, know that she still expects industry and application on our part, and revenges herself in proportion to our negligent ingratitude. The richest genius, like the most fertile soil, when uncultivated, shoots up into the rankest weeds; and instead of vines and olives for the pleasure and use of man, produces, to its slothful owner, the most abundant crop of poisons. ~ David Hume
2009

Quotes by people born this day, already used as QOTD:

Suggestions

The more exquisite any good is, of which a small specimen is afforded us, the sharper is the evil, allied to it; and few exceptions are found to this uniform law of nature. The most sprightly wit borders on madness; the highest effusions of joy produce the deepest melancholy; the most ravishing pleasures are attended with the most cruel lassitude and disgust; the most flattering hopes make way for the severest disappointments. ~ David Hume (born April 26, 1711)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:43, 19 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:10, 25 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Aphaia 19:15, 6 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 but this can be trimmed down to the last sentence starting from "the most flattering hopes make way for the severest disappointments." Zarbon 05:05, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

Hear the verbal protestations of all men: Nothing so certain as their religious tenets. Examine their lives: You will scarcely think that they repose the smallest confidence in them. ~ David Hume

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:43, 19 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:10, 25 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Aphaia 19:15, 6 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:05, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

Honour is a great check upon mankind: But where a considerable body of men act together, this check is, in a great measure, removed; since a man is sure to be approved of by his own party, for what promotes the common interest; and he soon learns to despise the clamours of adversaries. ~ David Hume

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:43, 19 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:10, 25 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Aphaia 19:15, 6 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 05:05, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

Bigotry tries to keep truth safe in its hand
With a grip that kills it. ~ Rabindranath Tagore (born May 7)

  • 4 because when trying to help something by enforcing one's own power, the end result may be moreso harmful than helpful. Zarbon 04:28, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 00:21, 6 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 23:21, 6 May 2008 (UTC)

Your idol is shattered in the dust to prove that God's dust is greater than your idol. ~ Rabindranath Tagore (born May 7)

  • 3 because people who believe that some people are immortal in their physical essence are proven wrong when the end of their life comes just as any other person. And truly, ashes to ashes, dust to dust becomes a descriptive outlook. Zarbon 04:28, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 00:21, 6 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 23:21, 6 May 2008 (UTC)

In this playhouse of infinite forms I have had my play, and here have I caught sight of him that is formless. ~ Rabindranath Tagore


All the great utterances of man have to be judged not by the letter but by the spirit — the spirit which unfolds itself with the growth of life in history. ~ Rabindranath Tagore

2004
There are very few human beings who receive the truth, complete and staggering, by instant illumination. Most of them acquire it fragment by fragment, on a small scale, by successive developments, cellularly, like a laborious mosaic. ~ Anaïs Nin
2005
If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about answers. ~ Thomas Pynchon (born 8 May 1937)
2006
While in the physical sciences the investigator will be able to measure what, on the basis of a prima facie theory, he thinks important, in the social sciences often that is treated as important which happens to be accessible to measurement. This is sometimes carried to the point where it is demanded that our theories must be formulated in such terms that they refer only to measurable magnitudes. ~ Friedrich Hayek (born 8 May 1899)
2007
And, oh! what beautiful years were these
When our hearts clung each to each;
When life was filled and our senses thrilled
In the first faint dawn of speech.

Thus life by life and love by love
We passed through the cycles strange,
And breath by breath and death by death
We followed the chain of change.

~ Langdon Smith ~
(In honor of our reaching a myriad of articles at Wikiquote, a selection from the official "10,000th article".)

2008
Freedom granted only when it is known beforehand that its effects will be beneficial is not freedom. ~ Friedrich Hayek (born 8 May 1899)
2009

Suggestions

Personally I prefer a liberal dictator to democratic government lacking liberalism. ~ Friedrich Hayek (born May 8)

  • 3 because, according to Hayek, an outward dictator is better than a clever camouflage, a government of dubious and questionable liberalism. Zarbon 04:50, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 04:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC) It is a clear expression of the importance of respect for liberty above respect for any particular form of rulership, whether of minorities or majorities.

Is there a greater tragedy imaginable than that, in our endeavour consciously to shape our future in accordance with high ideals, we should in fact unwittingly produce the very opposite of what we have been striving. ~ Friedrich Hayek (born May 8)

  • 3 because sometimes in accordance with "good" intentions, mankind can commit the worst of acts. Zarbon 04:50, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 04:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)

As is true with respect to other great evils, the measures by which war might be made altogether impossible for the future may well be worse than even war itself. ~ Friedrich Hayek (born May 8)

  • 3 because war prevention can end up being even deadlier than war itself. Zarbon 04:50, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 04:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC) An expression against the dangers of absolute tyranny, whatever it's motives might be.

The more the state 'plans' the more difficult planning becomes for the individual. ~ Friedrich Hayek (born May 8)

  • 3 because the more the state controls one's fate, the less one is able to control one's own fate. Zarbon 04:50, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 04:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)

The mind cannot foresee its own advance. ~ Friedrich Hayek (born May 8)

  • 3 because the mind does not know what developments are to be had in its mainframe, the brain capacity, so to speak. Zarbon 04:50, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 04:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC) (but I would probably prefer to extend this somewhat, with some associated observations)

Whenever you have an efficient government you have a dictatorship. ~ Harry S. Truman (born May 8, 1884)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 04:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because you can have a both separately as well. Zarbon 05:32, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 17:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)

The only thing new in the world is the history you don't know. ~ Harry S. Truman

  • 3 InvisibleSun 04:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because that's not the only new thing. Sorry, don't agree with this. Zarbon 05:32, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 17:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)

In a sense, one can never read the book that the author originally wrote, and one can never read the same book twice. ~ Edmund Wilson (born May 8, 1895)

  • 4 InvisibleSun 04:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because I'm sure many people do examine the same reading material more than once. If the context of the quote is meant to go beyond...to something deeper, it's rather too hidden insofar as understanding it goes. I'm wondering why you rated this one so high Invisible...I'm curious as to what makes the quote special to you...of course the author of any work would understand their work better than those who read it...it seems very logical and not very quoteworthy to me. If you still think the quote is rather good, I might be compelled to give it a 2 in the long run...but a 4? Why do you like it... Zarbon 05:32, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC) I too consider it a good quote. It indicates the truth that one's experiences and ideas can never be fully indicated in any writing or expressions, no matter how extensive or precise they may be in many ways, and that one's own interpretation and understanding of anything which is read or otherwise observed or thought upon must always be different to some degree, at different times, based upon one's always changing body of awareness and experience.
    • I understood what the quote was saying...I just don't think it has a meaning deep enough...it's moreso too straightforward and logical. I feel that we should strive for deeper quotes rather than the logical ones that are way too simplistic and leave no room for moral thought. Zarbon 23:37, 7 May 2008 (UTC)

At a time when it's possible for thirty people to stand on the top of Everest in one day, Antarctica still remains a remote, lonely and desolate continent. A place where it's possible to see the splendours and immensities of the natural world at its most dramatic and, what's more, witness them almost exactly as they were, long, long before human beings ever arrived on the surface of this planet. Long may it remain so. ~ David Attenborough (born May 8, 1926)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 04:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because this seems like a personal rant rather than a quote... Zarbon 05:32, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)

The only consolation he drew from the present chaos was that his theory managed to explain it. ~ Thomas Pynchon (born May 8, 1937)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 04:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because this leaves one rather clueless... Zarbon 05:32, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC) (but I would prefer to precede it with "He had decided long ago that no Situation had any objective reality: it only existed in the minds of those who happened to be in on it at any specific moment. ... "
    • Well, now that Kalki added the bit, it makes a little more sense as to what the quote is saying... Zarbon 23:37, 7 May 2008 (UTC)

There was no difference between the behavior of a god and the operations of pure chance. ~ Thomas Pynchon

  • 3 InvisibleSun 04:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 because sometimes the two are intertwined. Zarbon 05:32, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)

Liberty not only means that the individual has both the opportunity and the burden of choice; it also means that he must bear the consequences of his actions. ... Liberty and responsibility are inseparable. ~ Friedrich Hayek


Conservatism, though a necessary element in any stable society, is not a social program; in its paternalistic, nationalistic and power adoring tendencies it is often closer to socialism than true liberalism; and with its traditionalistic, anti-intellectual, and often mystical propensities it will never, except in short periods of disillusionment, appeal to the young and all those others who believe that some changes are desirable if this world is to become a better place. ~ Friedrich Hayek


If man is not to do more harm than good in his efforts to improve the social order, he will have to learn that in this, as in all other fields where essential complexity of an organized kind prevails, he cannot acquire the full knowledge which would make mastery of the events possible. He will therefore have to use what knowledge he can achieve, not to shape the results as the craftsman shapes his handiwork, but rather to cultivate a growth by providing the appropriate environment, in the manner in which the gardener does this for his plants. ~ Friedrich Hayek


The recognition of the insuperable limits to his knowledge ought indeed to teach the student of society a lesson of humility which should guard him against becoming an accomplice in men's fatal striving to control society — a striving which makes him not only a tyrant over his fellows, but which may well make him the destroyer of a civilization which no brain has designed but which has grown from the free efforts of millions of individuals. ~ Friedrich Hayek


Why should things be easy to understand? ~ Thomas Pynchon


I want to break out — to leave this cycle of infection and death. I want to be taken in love: so taken that you and I, and death, and life, will be gathered inseparable, into the radiance of what we would become... ~ Thomas Pynchon

  • 4 Kalki 17:21, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 18:23, 7 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because this is again very simplistic and has no hidden message other than the implication of holding strong to love. These love quotes are all bound to love and nothing more that exceeds into a moral arena. Plus, I don't agree with what Pynchon says either, if it's any consolation, although I don't judge based on whether I agree with the quote or not, just based on how moral and powerful it sounds, plus how deep the message is. Zarbon 23:37, 7 May 2008 (UTC)

The knife cuts through the apple like a knife cutting an apple. Everything is where it is, no clearer than usual, but certainly more present. So much has to be left behind now, so quickly. ~ Thomas Pynchon

2004
All I am I owe to my mother. I attribute all my success in life to the moral, intellectual and physical education I received from her. ~ George Washington (Mother's Day 2004)
2005
Life is a long lesson in humility. ~ J. M. Barrie (born 9 May 1860)
2006
The time for the healing of the wounds has come. The moment to bridge the chasms that divide us has come. The time to build is upon us. ~ Nelson Mandela (inaugurated as President of the Republic of South Africa, 9 May 1994)
2007
Somebody, after all, had to make a start. What we wrote and said is also believed by many others. They just don't dare express themselves as we did. ~ Sophie Scholl of the White Rose
2008
Those who bring sunshine into the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves. ~ J. M. Barrie (born 9 May 1860)
2009

Suggestions

Power is what spoils people. Yes, it seems to me that the seeking after power is the great danger and the great corruptor of mankind. ~ Baldur von Schirach (born May 9)

  • 4 because power can corrupt anyone. Zarbon 04:49, 18 April 2008 (UTC)
    • SOURCE: The Nuremberg Interviews by Leon Goldensohn, Robert Gellately - History - 2004 - Page 245
  • 2 InvisibleSun 06:21, 8 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Aphaia 08:57, 8 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 17:16, 8 May 2008 (UTC)

What we do we do not merely with our hands and brains, but with our hearts and souls. This has often become a tragic fate for us. ~ Baldur von Schirach (born May 9)

  • 3 Zarbon 04:49, 18 April 2008 (UTC)
    • SOURCE: The Face of the Third Reich: Portraits of the Nazi Leadership - by Joachim C. Fest - History - 1999 - Page 220
  • 1 InvisibleSun 06:21, 8 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Aphaia 08:57, 8 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 17:16, 8 May 2008 (UTC)

The life of every man is a diary in which he means to write one story, and writes another; and his humblest hour is when he compares the volume as it is with what he vowed to make it. ~ J. M. Barrie (born May 9)

  • 3 because when looking back at one's own life and comparing it to how one had originally planned it and how it actually turned out to be...it becomes an enigma in itself, Barrie describes it as humble, but in any case, it is a reminiscing of memories. Zarbon 05:08, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 4 InvisibleSun 06:21, 8 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Aphaia 08:57, 8 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 17:16, 8 May 2008 (UTC)

Standards always are out of date. That is what makes them standards. ~ Alan Bennett (born May 9, 1934)


The best moments in reading are when you come across something — a thought, a feeling, a way of looking at things — that you'd thought special, particular to you. And here it is, set down by someone else, a person you've never met, maybe even someone long dead. And it's as if a hand has come out, and taken yours. ~ Alan Bennett (from The History Boys, for which Bennett wrote both the play and the screenplay)


I am fully persuaded that I am worth inconceivably more to hang than any other purpose. ~ John Brown (born May 9, 1800)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 06:21, 8 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Aphaia 08:57, 8 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Zarbon 12:38, 8 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 17:16, 8 May 2008 (UTC)
2004
There are worlds beyond worlds and times beyond times, all of them true, all of them real, and all of them (as children know) penetrating each other. ~ P. L. Travers
2005
The world is more malleable than you think and it's waiting for you to hammer it into shape. ~ Bono (born 10 May 1960)
2006
The Truth lies not in the Yes and not in the No, but in the knowledge and the beginning from which the Yes and the No arise. ~ Karl Barth (born 10 May 1886)
2007
Life is a tragedy for those who feel, and a comedy for those who think. ~ Jean de La Bruyère, Les Caractères, (d. 10 May 1696)
2008
We're one, but we're not the same
We get to carry each other, carry each other... one.

~ Bono ~ (Born 10 May 1960)
2009

Suggestions

We must laugh before we are happy, for fear we die before we laugh at all. ~ Jean de La Bruyère, Les Caractères, (d. 10 May 1696)

  • 3 --Aphaia 05:27, 9 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 05:07, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 02:10, 9 May 2008 (UTC)
  • Since La Bruyère was born on August 16, I would propose that this quote be transferred to that date. - InvisibleSun 15:40, 9 May 2008 (UTC)

The Truth lies not in the Yes and not in the No, but in the knowledge and the beginning from which the Yes and the No arise. ~ Karl Barth (born May 10)

  • 3 because understanding that there is no definite yes and no, but rather a knowledge of all that is in between is key to comprehension of what truth is all about. Zarbon 05:21, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Aphaia 09:07, 8 May 2008 (UTC)
  • This was already used on this date in 2006.

I do not preach universal salvation, what I say is that I cannot exclude the possibility that God would save all men at the Judgment. ~ Karl Barth (born May 10)

  • 3 because there has been no positive nor negative assurance that men, even those who have heavily committed to sin would or would not enter salvation. The final judgment is but a perspective, the ideology of universal salvation, however, holds some truth. Zarbon 05:21, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Aphaia For people who have no Christianity background, it may not make a sense at all.
  • 3 Kalki 02:10, 9 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 15:40, 9 May 2008 (UTC)

Man as man can never know God: His wishing, seeking, and striving are all in vain. ~ Karl Barth (born May 10)

  • 3 because the image of God is not visible to the physical man...for the man of the material world is blinded by illusion. Zarbon 05:21, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 02:10, 9 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 15:40, 9 May 2008 (UTC)

What you don't have you don't need it
What you don't know you can feel it somehow

~ Bono (Born in this day)

Seeing a woman's child is like seeing a woman naked, in the way it changes how her face looks to you, how her face becomes less the whole story. ~ John Crowley

  • 3 Ningauble 20:55, 9 November 2008 (UTC) Suggested for Mother's Day, if it is not too starkly unconventional in perspective.


2004
The integral vision embodies an attempt to take the best of both worlds, ancient and modern. But that demands a critical stance willing to reject unflinchingly the worst of both as well. ~ Ken Wilber
2005
When you separate yourself by belief, by nationality, by tradition, it breeds violence. So a man who is trying to understand violence does not belong to any country, to any religion, to any political party or partial system; he is concerned with the total understanding of mankind. ~ J. Krishnamurti (born 11 May 1895)
2006
Positive vibrations man. That's what makes it work. That's reggae music. You can't look away because it's real. You listen to what I sing because I mean what I sing, there's no secret, no big deal. Just honesty, that's all. ~ Bob Marley (died 11 May 1981)
2007
The poet in a golden clime was born,
With golden stars above;
Dower'd with the hate of hate, the scorn of scorn,
The love of love.

~ Alfred Tennyson ~
2008
Poets say science takes away from the beauty of the stars — mere globs of gas atoms. Nothing is 'mere'. I too can see the stars on a desert night, and feel them. But do I see less or more? The vastness of the heavens stretches my imagination — stuck on this carousel my little eye can catch one-million-year-old light. A vast pattern — of which I am a part... What is the pattern or the meaning or the why? It does not do harm to the mystery to know a little more about it. ~ Richard Feynman (born 11 May 1918)
2009

Suggestions

Say you just can't live that negative way
You know what I mean
Make way for the positive day
Cause it's a new day. ~ Bob Marley (died 11 May 1981), "Positive Vibration", Rastaman Vibration (1976)

  • 2 Jeff Q (talk) 05:51, 10 May 2006 (UTC)
  • 2 ~ I did some quick research, and the writing credits for this are to Vincent Ford, but there are indications that Marley simply gave Ford credit for these and other lyrics. Taking up the suggestion for something by Marley I have found a couple that, while not fully sourced as yet, I find plausible and not likely to become disputed. ~ Kalki 22:04, 10 May 2006 (UTC)
  • 2 Aphaia 09:39, 10 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:10, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 22:04, 10 May 2008 (UTC)

I don't have prejudice against myself. My father was a white and my mother was black. Them call me half-caste or whatever. Me don't dip on nobody's side. Me don't dip on the black man's side nor the white man's side. Me dip on God's side, the one who create me and cause me to come from black and white. ~ Bob Marley (date of death)

  • 3 Kalki 22:04, 10 May 2006 (UTC)
  • 1 Jeff Q (talk) 23:56, 10 May 2006 (UTC). I'd prefer a less weighty quote.
  • 2 Aphaia 09:39, 10 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:10, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:04, 10 May 2008 (UTC)

There are all kinds of interesting questions that come from a knowledge of science, which only adds to the excitement and mystery and awe of a flower. It only adds. I don't understand how it subtracts. ~ Richard Feynman


For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled. ~ Richard Feynman


Dance is the hidden language of the soul ~ Martha Graham (date of birth).


It is bias to think that the art of war is just for killing people. It is not to kill people, it is to kill evil. It is a strategem to give life to many people by killing the evil of one person. ~ Yagyū Munenori (date of death, date of birth unknown)

  • 3 because there is truly beauty in the art of war. Zarbon 04:47, 20 May 2008 (UTC)

It is easy to kill someone with a slash of a sword. It is hard to be impossible for others to cut down. ~ Yagyū Munenori

  • 3 because as easy as it is to defeat the opponent, the opponent may win with ease just as well. Zarbon 04:47, 20 May 2008 (UTC)

See first with your mind, then with your eyes, and finally with your body. ~ Yagyū Munenori

  • 3 because the physical strike comes last. It is more important to plan ahead before that attack. Zarbon 04:47, 20 May 2008 (UTC)

Once a fight has started, if you get involved in thinking about what to do, you will be cut down by your opponent with the very next blow. ~ Yagyū Munenori

  • 3 because there is a time to contemplate and a time to attack and defend. Zarbon 04:47, 20 May 2008 (UTC)

There may be a hundred stances and sword positions, but you win with just one. ~ Yagyū Munenori

  • 3 because it is the thunderous winning blow that counts. Zarbon 04:47, 20 May 2008 (UTC)

Conquering evil, not the opponent is the essence of swordsmanship. ~ Yagyū Munenori

  • 2 Zarbon 04:47, 20 May 2008 (UTC)

If you gaze at a single leaf on a single tree, you do not see the other leaves. If you face the tree with no intention and do not fix your eyes on a single leaf, then you will see all the many leaves. If your mind is preoccupied with one leaf, you do not see the others, if you do not set your attention on one; you will see hundreds and thousands of leaves. ~ Yagyū Munenori

  • 3 because one must concentrate on all aspects in order to avoid dogmatism. Zarbon 04:47, 20 May 2008 (UTC)

If you have attained mastery of swordlessness, you will never be without a sword. ~ Yagyū Munenori

  • 3 because it is imperative for one to train without a weapon just as much in order to survive all predicaments. Zarbon 04:47, 20 May 2008 (UTC)

There's a great and unutterable beauty in all this. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • 2 Zarbon 04:15, 1 July 2008 (UTC)

The observer is the observed. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • 2 Zarbon 04:15, 1 July 2008 (UTC)

Silence is difficult and arduous, it is not to be played with. It isn't something that you can experience by reading a book, or by listening to a talk, or by sitting together, or by retiring into a wood or a monastery. I am afraid none of these things will bring about this silence. This silence demands intense psychological work. You have to be burningly aware of your snobbishness, aware of your fears, your anxieties, your sense of guilt. And when you die to all that, then out of that dying comes the beauty of silence. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • 3 Zarbon 04:15, 1 July 2008 (UTC)

So, the questioner wants to know why it is that he cannot go beyond all these superficial wrangles of the mind. For the simple reason that, consciously or unconsciously, the mind is always seeking something, and that very search brings violence, competition, the sense of utter dissatisfaction. It is only when the mind is completely still that there is a possibility of touching the deep waters. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • 3 Zarbon 04:15, 1 July 2008 (UTC)

We human beings are what we have been for millions of years—colossally greedy, envious, aggressive, jealous, anxious and despairing, with occasional flashes of joy and affection. We are a strange mixture of hate, fear and gentleness; we are both violence and peace. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • 2 Zarbon 04:15, 1 July 2008 (UTC)

We are afraid of the known and afraid of the unknown. That is our daily life and in that there is no hope, and therefore every form of philosophy, every form of theological concept, is merely an escape from the actual reality of what is. All outward forms of change brought about by wars, revolutions, reformations, laws and ideologies have failed completely to change the basic nature of man and therefore of society. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • 2 Zarbon 04:15, 1 July 2008 (UTC)

It's no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • 2 Zarbon 04:15, 1 July 2008 (UTC)

Tradition becomes our security, and when the mind is secure it is in decay. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • 3 Zarbon 04:15, 1 July 2008 (UTC)
2004
It may help to understand human affairs to be clear that most of the great triumphs and tragedies of history are caused, not by people being fundamentally good or fundamentally bad, but by people being fundamentally people. ~ Good Omens (by Gaiman & Pratchett)
2005
Were there none who were discontented with what they have, the world would never reach anything better. ~ Florence Nightingale (born 12 May 1820)
2006
Duty, Honor, Country — those three hallowed words reverently dictate what you ought to be, what you can be, what you will be. They are your rallying point to build courage when courage seems to fail, to regain faith when there seems to be little cause for faith, to create hope when hope becomes forlorn. ~ Douglas MacArthur, "Duty, Honor, Country" valedictory address to West Point on 12 May 1962.
2007
Unto the furthest flood-brim look with me;
Then reach on with thy thought till it be drown'd.
Miles and miles distant though the last line be,
And though thy soul sail leagues and leagues beyond,—
Still, leagues beyond those leagues, there is more sea.

~ Dante Gabriel Rossetti ~ (born 12 May 1828)
2008
I never lose an opportunity of urging a practical beginning, however small, for it is wonderful how often in such matters the mustard-seed germinates and roots itself. ~ Florence Nightingale
2009

Suggestions

And Love, our light at night and shade at noon,
Lulls us to rest with songs, and turns away
All shafts of shelterless tumultuous day.

~ Dante Gabriel Rossetti ~ (date of birth)

None would live past years again,
Yet all hope pleasure in what yet remain;
And from the dregs of life think to receive
What the first sprightly running could not give.

~ John Dryden ~ died on May 12 {May 1 O.S.}, 1700)

To God alone may women complain without insulting Him! ~ Florence Nightingale

  • 2 because to complain to anyone else would in turn backfire and be viewed as an insult. Zarbon 23:48, 2 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 01:05, 11 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 18:09, 11 May 2008 (UTC)

People talk about imitating Christ, and imitate Him in the little trifling formal things, such as washing the feet, saying His prayer, and so on; but if anyone attempts the real imitation of Him, there are no bounds to the outcry with which the presumption of that person is condemned. ~ Florence Nightingale


I think one's feelings waste themselves in words, they ought all to be distilled into actions and into actions which bring results. ~ Florence Nightingale


I thought of myself an atheist until I realized it was a belief, too ... It's a shame everything has to have a label. ~ George Carlin

  • 3 Kalki 00:42, 2 July 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 00:48, 2 July 2008 (UTC)
2004
I believe that man will not merely endure: he will prevail. He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance. ~ William Faulkner
2005
It behoved that there should be sin — but all shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of thing shall be well. ~ Julian of Norwich (her famous visions occurred on 13 May 1373)
2006
"Fire" does not matter, "earth" and "air" and "water'" do not matter. "I" do not matter. No word matters. But man forgets reality and remembers words. ~ Roger Zelazny, Lord of Light (born 13 May 1937)
2007
A mother is the truest friend we have, when trials heavy and sudden, fall upon us; when adversity takes the place of prosperity; when friends who rejoice with us in our sunshine desert us; when trouble thickens around us, still will she cling to us, and endeavor by her kind precepts and counsels to dissipate the clouds of darkness, and cause peace to return to our hearts. ~ Washington Irving (Mother's Day U.S., Canada)
2008
Death and Light are everywhere, always, and they begin, end, strive, attend, into and upon the Dream of the Nameless that is the world, burning words within Samsaara, perhaps to create a thing of beauty. ~ Roger Zelazny in Lord of Light
2009

Suggestions

I made a great discovery. I don't believe in anything anymore. Objects do not exist for me, except that there is a harmonious relationship among them, and also between them and myself. When one reaches this harmony, one reaches a sort of intellectual void. This was everything becomes possible, everything becomes legitimate, and life is a perpetual revelation. This is true song. ~ Georges Braque (born 1882-05-13)

  • 3 Aphaia
  • 3 Kalki 00:01, 13 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:13, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3. This quote was unsourced. I sourced it and replaced the unsourced version in the article. The quote now reads: "I have made a great discovery. I no longer believe in anything. Objects don't exist for me except in so far as a rapport exists between them or between them and myself. When one attains this harmony, one reaches a sort of intellectual non-existence — what I can only describe as a sense of peace, which makes everything possible and right. Life then becomes a perpetual revelation. That is true poetry." My vote is then for the sourced quote. - InvisibleSun 07:20, 12 May 2008 (UTC)

Either it possesses a certain element of irrationality itself, like living things, or it is an intelligence of such an order that some of its processes only seem irrational to lesser beings. Either explanation amounts to the same from a practical standpoint. ~ Roger Zelazny Prince of Chaos

  • 3 Aphaia
  • 3 Kalki 00:01, 13 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:13, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2. What is the "it" in the first sentence? - InvisibleSun 07:20, 12 May 2008 (UTC)

Not living in fear is a great gift, because certainly these days we do it so much. And do you know what I like about comedy? You can’t laugh and be afraid at the same time — of anything. If you're laughing, I defy you to be afraid. ~ Stephen Colbert (born May 13, 1964)

  • 4 InvisibleSun 07:20, 12 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 because this one is rather nice. Although I'd much prefer to settle with the fear principle than that of laughter. It's like a choice in movies so to speak, better to go with all genres and comedy last. But I still think it's a good quote. Zarbon 15:54, 12 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 00:18, 14 May 2008 (UTC)
2004
In the end it is how you fight, as much as why you fight, that makes your cause good or bad. ~ Freeman Dyson
2005
If I had my way, if I was lucky enough, if I could be on the brink my entire life — that great sense of expectation and excitement without the disappointment — that would be the perfect state. ~ Cate Blanchett (born 14 May 1969)
2006
It is confidently expected that the period is at hand, when man, through ignorance, shall not much longer inflict unnecessary misery on man; because the mass of mankind will become enlightened, and will clearly discern that by so acting they will inevitably create misery to themselves. ~ Robert Owen (born 14 May 1771)
2007
I would like to be remembered as a man who had a wonderful time living life, a man who had good friends, fine family — and I don't think I could ask for anything more than that, actually. ~ Frank Sinatra (died on 15 May 1998)
2008
Errors now almost universally exist, and must be overcome solely by the force of reason; and as reason, to effect the most beneficial purposes, makes her advance by slow degrees, and progressively substantiates one truth of high import after another, it will be evident, to minds of comprehensive and accurate thought, that by these and similar compromises alone can success be rationally expected in practice. For such compromises bring truth and error before the public; and whenever they are fairly exhibited together, truth must ultimately prevail.
  • initially proposed by Aphaia, extended form proposed by Kalki
2009

Suggestions

It is the interest of the individual and of all society, that he should be made, at the earliest period, to understand his own construction, the proper use of its parts, and how to keep them at all times in a state of health. ~ Robert Owen


Union and co-operation in war obviously increase the power of the individual a thousand fold. Is there the shadow of a reason why they should not produce equal effects in peace; why the principle of co-operation should not give to men the same superior powers, and advantages, (and much greater) in the creation, preservation, distribution and enjoyment of wealth? ~ Robert Owen


What ideas individuals may attach to the term "Millennium" I know not; but I know that society may be formed so as to exist without crime, without poverty, with health greatly improved, with little, if any misery, and with intelligence and happiness increased a hundredfold; and no obstacle whatsoever intervenes at this moment except ignorance to prevent such a state of society from becoming universal. ~ Robert Owen


Is it not the interest of the human race, that every one should be so taught and placed, that he would find his highest enjoyment to arise from the continued practice of doing all in his power to promote the well-being, and happiness, of every man, woman, and child, without regard to their class, sect, party, country or colour? ~ Robert Owen

2004
In the fields of observation chance favors only the prepared mind. ~ Louis Pasteur
2005
Things had to be dreamed of before they became realities. So I believe that dreams — day dreams, you know, with your eyes wide open and your brain machinery whizzing — are likely to lead to the betterment of the world. The imaginative child will become the imaginative man or woman most apt to invent, and therefore to foster civilization. ~ L. Frank Baum (born 15 May 1856)
2006
The voice of the individual artist may seem perhaps of no more consequence than the whirring of a cricket in the grass, but the arts do live continuously, and they live literally by faith; their names and their shapes and their uses and their basic meanings survive unchanged in all that matters through times of interruption, diminishment, neglect; they outlive governments and creeds and the societies, even the very civilization that produced them. They cannot be destroyed altogether because they represent the substance of faith and the only reality. They are what we find again when the ruins are cleared away. ~ Katherine Anne Porter (born 15 May 1890)
2007
Human life itself may be almost pure chaos, but the work of the artist — the only thing he's good for — is to take these handfuls of confusion and disparate things, things that seem to be irreconcilable, and put them together in a frame to give them some kind of shape and meaning. Even if it's only his view of a meaning. That's what he's for — to give his view of life. ~ Katherine Anne Porter
2008
Every child saved with my help and the help of all the wonderful secret messengers, who today are no longer living, is the justification of my existence on this earth, and not a title to glory. ~ Irena Sendler (recent death)
2009

Suggestions

I have learned to regard fame as a will-o-the-wisp which, when caught, is not worth the possession; but to please a child is a sweet and lovely thing that warms one's heart and brings its own reward. ~ L. Frank Baum


The real sin against life is to abuse and destroy beauty, even one's own — even more, one's own, for that has been put in our care and we are responsible for its well-being. ~ Katherine Anne Porter

  • 3 Kalki 05:18, 13 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:06, 14 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 4 Beauty is only skin deep, but this one I truly like! Vanity defined. Zarbon 05:18, 23 April 2008 (UTC)


2004
If we begin with certainties, we shall end in doubts; if we begin with doubts, and are patient, we shall end in certainties. ~ Marcus Aurelius
2005
You say that you are my judge. I don't know if you are — but take care not to judge wrongly, lest you place yourself in great danger. ~ Jehanne Darc (Jeanne d'Arc; Joan of Arc) (canonized 16 May 1920)
2006
I like quoting Einstein. Know why? Because nobody dares contradict you. ~ Studs Terkel (born 16 May 1912)
2007
The universe is flux, life is opinion. ~ Marcus Aurelius
2008
Nothing happens to anybody which he is not fitted by nature to bear. ~ Marcus Aurelius
2009

Suggestions

Whatever is in any way beautiful hath its source of beauty in itself, and is complete in itself; praise forms no part of it. So it is none the worse nor the better for being praised. ~ Marcus Aurelius

  • 3 Aphaia 18:07, 14 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 21:40, 14 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:20, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Perhaps the Marcus Aurelius quotes should be moved to April 26. - InvisibleSun 21:42, 15 May 2008 (UTC)
I agree this last remaining suggestion for Aurelius should be moved to that date, as it seems Aphaia had originally suggested them here because Aurelius had been quoted by me here in 2004, before the policy of generally preferring some tie-in to the date was firmly established. ~ Kalki 00:18, 16 May 2008 (UTC)

I have learned, by some experience, that virtue and patriotism, vice and selfishness, are found in all parties, and that they differ less in their motives than in the policies they pursue. ~ William H. Seward (born May 16, 1801)


The slave system is one of constant danger, distrust, suspicion, and watchfulness. It debases those whose toil alone can produce wealth and resources for defence, to the lowest degree of which human nature is capable, to guard against mutiny and insurrection, and thus wastes energies which otherwise might be employed in national development and aggrandizement. The free-labor system educates all alike, and by opening all the fields of industrial employment and all the departments of authority, to the unchecked and equal rivalry of all classes of men, at once secures universal contentment, and brings into the highest possible activity all the physical, moral, and social energies of the whole state. ~ William H. Seward

  • 4 If this is considered too long, it could begin at the words "The free-labor system..." - InvisibleSun 21:59, 15 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:45, 15 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 but only if it is shortened as Invisible suggested. Zarbon 04:42, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
2004
Explanations exist; they have existed for all times, for there is always an easy solution to every human problems — neat, plausible, and wrong. ~ H. L. Mencken
2005
I had a stick of Carefree gum, but it didn't work. I felt pretty good while I was blowing that bubble, but as soon as the gum lost its flavor, I was back to pondering my mortality. ~ Mitch Hedberg
2006
There is no formula to it because writing every song, for me, is a little journey... It's everything. It's the walk you take in the morning, it's the night before, the meeting with people, landscapes, the chats, all of that evolves in some way into melody, but I'm not sure how it's going to happen. I'm dealing with the unknown all the time and that is exciting. ~ Enya (born 17 May 1961)
2007
We are all, always, the desire not to die. This desire is as immeasurable and varied as life's complexity, but at bottom this is what it is: To continue to be, to be more and more, to develop and to endure. All the force we have, all our energy and clearness of mind serve to intensify themselves in one way or another. We intensify ourselves with new impressions, new sensations, new ideas. We endeavour to take what we do not have and to add it to ourselves. Humanity is the desire for novelty founded upon the fear of death. That is what it is. ~ Henri Barbusse
  • selected by Kalki (born 17 May 1873)
2008
I believe, in spite of all, in truth's victory. I believe in the momentous value, hereafter inviolable, of those few truly fraternal men in all the countries of the world, who, in the oscillation of national egoisms let loose, stand up and stand out, steadfast as the glorious statues of Right and Duty. ~ Henri Barbusse
2009

Suggestions

Sometimes people mistake the way I talk for what I am thinking. ~ Idi Amin (born May 17)

  • 4 because everyone doesn't say what they think. It's a beautiful admittance to the human thought process and the actual sayings themselves. Zarbon 03:39, 25 April 2008 (UTC)
    • SOURCE: Leaders and Their Followers in a Dangerous World - Page 17 by Jerrold M. Post -Biography & Autobiography - 2004
  • 1 Kalki 14:04, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 19:58, 16 May 2008 (UTC)

In any country there must be people who have to die. They are the sacrifices any nation has to make to achieve law and order. ~ Idi Amin (born May 17)

  • 3 Zarbon 03:39, 25 April 2008 (UTC)
    • SOURCE: 101 People You Won't Meet in Heaven - Page 11 - by Michael Powell - History - 2007
  • 1 Kalki 14:04, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 InvisibleSun 19:58, 16 May 2008 (UTC)

If we knew the meaning to everything that is happening to us, then there would be no meaning. ~ Idi Amin (born May 17)

  • 3 because there would be no meaning without the great mystery. Zarbon 03:39, 25 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 14:04, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 19:58, 16 May 2008 (UTC)

You cannot run faster than a bullet. ~ Idi Amin (born May 17)

  • 3 because this is absolutely true. Zarbon 03:39, 25 April 2008 (UTC)
    • SOURCE: The Mammoth Book of Zingers, Quips, and One-Liners - Page 51 - by Geoff Tibballs -Humor - 2004
  • 1 Kalki 14:04, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 InvisibleSun 19:58, 16 May 2008 (UTC)

I am not a politician but a professional soldier. ~ Idi Amin (born May 17)

  • 3 because the sincerity of being a soldier crosses the boundary of politics and government and becomes a life in itself. Zarbon 03:39, 25 April 2008 (UTC)
    • SOURCE: When Illness Strikes the Leader: The Dilemma of the Captive King - Page 57 - by Jerrold M. Post, Robert S. Robins - Biography & Autobiography - 1993
  • 1 Kalki 14:04, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 InvisibleSun 19:58, 16 May 2008 (UTC)

There are cloudy moments when one asks himself if men do not deserve all the disasters into which they rush! No — I recover myself — they do not deserve them. But we, instead of saying "I wish" must say "I will." And what we will, we must will to build it, with order, with method, beginning at the beginning, when once we have been as far as that beginning. We must not only open our eyes, but our arms, our wings. ~ Henri Barbusse

  • 3 Kalki 14:04, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because this is another simplistic description of restoring order to where there is chaos. These are very simplistic sayings, of which I had already thoroughly examined the entire Barbusse page and found nothing worthwhile. Zarbon 14:50, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 19:58, 16 May 2008 (UTC)

While all brutal forces clash with themselves, all moral forces make mighty harmony together. ~ Henri Barbusse

  • 3 Kalki 14:04, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because I already examined the entire Barbusse page prior and I did not find one quote worthy to place here. Almost everything was a statement of the obvious human characteristics and psyche. This is by far a great example of a simplistic statement...forces clash...amd harmony...I mean come on, seriously. There's like no deeper meaning to it whatsoever. Zarbon 14:50, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 19:58, 16 May 2008 (UTC)

Yes, there is a Divinity, one from which we must never turn aside for the guidance of our huge inward life and of the share we have as well in the life of all men. It is called the truth. ~ Henri Barbusse

  • 3 Kalki 14:04, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because this is blatantly obvious and a waste, from what I can take away, with no offense. Zarbon 14:50, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 19:58, 16 May 2008 (UTC)

Affection is the greatest of human feelings because it is made of respect, of lucidity, and light. To understand the truth and make one's self equal to it is everything; and to love is the same thing as to know and to understand. Affection, which I call also compassion, because I see no difference between them, dominates everything by reason of its clear sight. It is a sentiment as immense as if it were mad, and yet it is wise, and of human things it is the only perfect one. There is no great sentiment which is not completely held on the arms of compassion. ~ Henri Barbusse

  • 3 Kalki 14:04, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because these quotes dealing with compassion, love, and furthermore, now "affection" are truly not meaningful. Zarbon 14:50, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 19:58, 16 May 2008 (UTC)

Music is like a mirror in front of you. You're exposing everything, but surely that's better than suppressing. ... You have to dig deep and that can be hard for anybody, no matter what profession. I feel that I need to actually push myself to the limit to feel happy with the end result. ~ Enya

  • 3 Kalki 14:04, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because as with the Barbusse page, I found nothing worthwhile on the Enya page either. This is a statement that the musician decided to make and in no way is it memorable. Never mind that but in no way is it even worthwhile, not to mention the fact that it has no deeper meaning.Zarbon 14:50, 16 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 19:58, 16 May 2008 (UTC)


2004
Love me for love's sake, that evermore thou may'st love on, through love's eternity. ~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning
2005
To fear love is to fear life, and those who fear life are already three parts dead. ~ Bertrand Russell (born 18 May 1872)
2006
A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread — and Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness —
Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!

~ Omar Khayyám (born 18 May 1048)
2007
The opposition of instinct and reason is mainly illusory. Instinct, intuition, or insight is what first leads to the beliefs which subsequent reason confirms or confutes; but the confirmation, where it is possible, consists, in the last analysis, of agreement with other beliefs no less instinctive. Reason is a harmonising, controlling force rather than a creative one. Even in the most purely logical realms, it is insight that first arrives at what is new. ~ Bertrand Russell
2008
To save the world requires faith and courage: faith in reason, and courage to proclaim what reason shows to be true. ~ Bertrand Russell
2009

Suggestions

A gospel of work for work's sake never produced any work worth doing. ~ Bertrand Russell (born May 18, 1872)


Thus contemplation not only enlarges the objects of our thoughts, but also the objects of our actions and our affections: it makes us citizens of the universe, not only of one walled city at war with the rest. ~ Bertrand Russell

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:04, 14 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 19:27, 17 May 2007 (UTC) but would either trim the "thus" or extend it thus:
The impartiality which, in contemplation, is the unalloyed desire for truth, is the very same quality of mind which, in action, is justice, and in emotion is that universal love which can be given to all, and not only to those who are judged useful or admirable. Thus contemplation not only enlarges the objects of our thoughts, but also the objects of our actions and our affections: it makes us citizens of the universe, not only of one walled city at war with the rest. In this citizenship of the universe consists man's true freedom, and his liberation from the thraldom of narrow hopes and fears.
  • Comment: Would prefer this longer quote. - InvisibleSun 22:01, 17 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 05:25, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

Philosophy is to be studied, not for the sake of any definite answers to its questions, since no definite answers can, as a rule, be known to be true, but rather for the sake of the questions themselves; because these questions enlarge our conception of what is possible, enrich our intellectual imagination and diminish the dogmatic assurance which closes the mind against speculation; but above all because, through the greatness of the universe which philosophy contemplates, the mind is also rendered great, and becomes capable of that union with the universe which constitutes its highest good. ~ Bertrand Russell


The point of philosophy is to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it. ~ Bertrand Russell


Conventional people are roused to fury by departures from convention, largely because they regard such departures as a criticism of themselves. ~ Bertrand Russell


Modern methods of production have given us the possibility of ease and security for all; we have chosen, instead, to have overwork for some and starvation for the others. Hitherto we have continued to be as energetic as we were before there were machines; in this we have been foolish, but there is no reason to go on being foolish for ever. ~ Bertrand Russell


Dogmatism and skepticism are both, in a sense, absolute philosophies; one is certain of knowing, the other of not knowing. What philosophy should dissipate is certainty, whether of knowledge or ignorance. ~ Bertrand Russell

  • 3 InvisibleSun 07:04, 14 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 19:27, 17 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Aphaia 22:05, 17 May 2007 (UTC) (It reminds me Fichte's quote about dogmatism and criticism, perhaps Russel was influenced/inspired.)
  • 3 because although I dislike dogmatism, it exists in many humans and is one of mankind's greatest follies. Zarbon 05:25, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

Every man would like to be God, if it were possible; some few find it difficult to admit the impossibility. ~ Bertrand Russell


The good life is one inspired by love and guided by knowledge. ~ Bertrand Russell


A stupid man's report of what a clever man says is never accurate, because he unconsciously translates what he hears into something that he can understand. ~ Bertrand Russell


2004
It is love alone that gives worth to all things. ~ St. Teresa of Avila (Teresa de Jesús)
2005
Time is on the side of the oppressed today, it's against the oppressor. Truth is on the side of the oppressed today, it's against the oppressor. You don't need anything else. ~ Malcolm X (born 19 May 1925)
2006
Faith is a continuum, and we each fall on that line where we may. By attempting to rigidly classify ethereal concepts like faith, we end up debating semantics to the point where we entirely miss the obvious — that is, that we are all trying to decipher life's big mysteries, and we're each following our own paths of enlightenment. ~ Dan Brown (author of The Da Vinci Code; film adaptation released worldwide on 19 May 2006)
2007
With all reverence, I would say, let God do His work, we will see to ours. Bring in the candles. ~ Abraham Davenport (Statement on 19 May 1780, "New England's Dark Day" which many feared might be the coming of the Last Judgment; as quoted by John Greenleaf Whittier.
2008
Mankind is a single body and each nation a part of that body. We must never say "What does it matter to me if some part of the world is ailing?" If there is such an illness, we must concern ourselves with it as though we were having that illness. ~ Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (precise birthdate unknown, but celebrated on May 19)
2009

Suggestions

Once you change your philosophy, you change your thought pattern. Once you change your thought pattern, you change your — your attitude. Once you change your attitude, it changes your behavior pattern and then you go on into some action. ~ Malcolm X


If the Tiger does not stop fighting the Elephant, the Elephant will die of exhaustion. ~ Ho Chi Minh (born May 19)

  • 3 because this is so true. A battle can be won by tiring the greater enemy into defeat. I love this quote wholeheartedly. It sets the idea of david and goliath into an understandable and moral realm. Zarbon 06:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)
    • Source: A Short History of Communism - Page 137 - by Robert Harvey - Political Science - 2004
  • 3 Kalki 00:08, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 09:19, 18 May 2008 (UTC)

Men, I am not ordering you to attack. I am ordering you to die. ~ Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (born May 19)

  • 3 because in this one statement, the leader explains to the soldiers how low their chances of survival would be in one assault, yet in this honest situation, gives courage and strikes honor and valor, allowing the soldier to serve full-throttle and serve to the bitter end. Zarbon 05:08, 27 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 00:08, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 InvisibleSun 09:19, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
  • Comment: Although Atatürk's birthdate is unknown, this is a good day for posting quotes for him because it has become the Turkish national holiday in his honor. - InvisibleSun 09:32, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
  • Comment: But I could've sworn he's born on May 19th. Maybe it's not listed on the wikipedia pages, but it is listed in numerous other sites, for reference purposes. Zarbon 16:52, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
His birthdate isn't listed on Wikipedia because they evidently concluded, based on the information shown here, that his birthdate could not be determined. - InvisibleSun 21:40, 18 May 2008 (UTC)

Humankind consists of two sexes, woman and man. Is it possible that a mass is improved by the improvement of only one part and the other ignored? Is it possible that if half of a mass is tied to earth with chains and the other half can soar into skies? ~ Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (born May 19)

  • 4 because women and men are constantly feuding over equality for the sexes...and this quote says a lot, especially when assuming that one is bound to the ground. Of course both male and female are both needed and as important, hence the visual enigmatic reference here. Zarbon 05:08, 27 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 00:08, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 4 InvisibleSun 09:19, 18 May 2008 (UTC)

Eventually it comes to you: the thing that makes you exceptional, if you are at all, is inevitably that which must also make you lonely. ~ Lorraine Hansberry (born May 19, 1930)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 09:19, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 14:21, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 because those who are bound to being exceptional are bound to loneliness. Nice. Zarbon 16:54, 18 May 2008 (UTC)

It struck me that the movies had spent more than half a century saying, "They lived happily ever after" and the following quarter century warning that they'll be lucky to make it through the weekend. Possibly now we are entering a third era, in which the movies will be sounding a note of cautious optimism: You know, it just might work. ~ Nora Ephron (born May 19, 1941)


2004
No theory, no ready-made system, no book that has ever been written will save the world. I cleave to no system. I am a true seeker. ~ Mikhail Bakunin
2005
If all mankind minus one were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind. ~ John Stuart Mill (born 20 May 1806)
2006
Love is like some fresh spring, first a stream and then a river, changing its aspect and its nature as it flows to plunge itself in some boundless ocean, where restricted natures only find monotony, but where great souls are engulfed in endless contemplation. ~ Honoré de Balzac (born 20 May 1799)
2007
The prevailing tendency to regard all the marked distinctions of human character as innate, and in the main indelible, and to ignore the irresistible proofs that by far the greater part of those differences, whether between individuals, races, or sexes, are such as not only might but naturally would be produced by differences in circumstances, is one of the chief hindrances to the rational treatment of great social questions, and one of the greatest stumbling blocks to human improvement. ~ John Stuart Mill
2008
The peculiar evil of silencing the expression of an opinion is, that it is robbing the human race; posterity as well as the existing generation; those who dissent from the opinion, still more than those who hold it. If the opinion is right, they are deprived of the opportunity of exchanging error for truth: if wrong, they lose, what is almost as great a benefit, the clearer perception and livelier impression of truth, produced by its collision with error. ~ John Stuart Mill
2009

Suggestions

Ages are no more infallible than individuals; every age having held many opinions which subsequent ages have deemed not only false but absurd; and it is as certain that many opinions now general will be rejected by future ages, as it is that many, once general, are rejected by the present. ~ John Stuart Mill


When an opinion is true, it may be extinguished once, twice, or many times, but in the course of ages there will generally be found persons to rediscover it, until some one of its reappearances falls on a time when from favourable circumstances it escapes persecution until it has made such head as to withstand all subsequent attempts to suppress it. ~ John Stuart Mill


The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others. His own good, either physical or moral, is not a sufficient warrant. He cannot rightfully be compelled to do or forbear because it will be better for him to do so, because it will make him happier, because, in the opinions of others, to do so would be wise, or even right. These are good reasons for remonstrating with him, or reasoning with him, or persuading him or entreating him, but not for compelling him, or visiting him with any evil, in case he do otherwise. ~ John Stuart Mill

  • 3 InvisibleSun 09:02, 19 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 09:26, 19 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:29, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 In my preferences QotD may be preferred to be shorter. --Aphaia 10:40, 19 May 2008 (UTC)

While every one well knows himself to be fallible, few think it necessary to take any precautions against their own fallibility, or admit the supposition that any opinion, of which they feel very certain, may be one of the examples of the error to which they acknowledge themselves to be liable. ~ John Stuart Mill


Truth gains more even by the errors of one who, with due study and preparation, thinks for himself, than by the true opinions of those who only hold them because they do not suffer themselves to think. ~ John Stuart Mill


However unwillingly a person who has a strong opinion may admit the possibility that his opinion may be false, he ought to be moved by the consideration that, however true it may be, if it is not fully, frequently, and fearlessly discussed, it will be held as a dead dogma, not a living truth. ~ John Stuart Mill


Many false opinions may be exchanged for true ones, without in the least altering the habits of mind of which false opinions are made. ~ John Stuart Mill


There is something great and terrible about suicide. ~ Honoré de Balzac

  • 3 because in death comes the terror and the tragedy, but in accepting and approaching the demise comes a grandeur of sort. The moments can be described as terrible and great all at the same time. It's one of the major reasons why I love many of the characters I love, because their demise, whether in suicide or homicide, is made magnificently brilliant, a concoction of emotion and sheer bitter power expressed through final moments. Zarbon 00:03, 3 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 06:19, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 00:18, 19 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Without context, it is meaningless and even sounds offensive POV. As a widow of suicidal dead husband, I feel quite disgusted. --Aphaia 10:40, 19 May 2008 (UTC)

We have no solution, you shall continue to live like dogs, and whoever wishes may leave, and we will see where this process leads. ~ Moshe Dayan (born May 20)

  • 3 because the truth is sometimes the best remedy. Zarbon 04:56, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 0 See the discussion page for Dayan about this continually disputed quote. It was moved from Attributed to Sourced by an editor in March 2008. It will likely be moved, deleted and restored many more times. Even without its doubtful verification, I wouldn't be inclined to vote for it. InvisibleSun 06:19, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
    • Source: Fateful Triangle: The United States, Israel, and the Palestinians - Page 561 - Noam Chomsky - Political Science - 1999
    • Comment: Now it is sourced so you can repeat your vote. Zarbon 21:37, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
  • This, however, is the very source that's endlessly disputed; see the discussion page on Dayan for the reasons. Even if there were more of an agreement on the source, I would end up giving it a 1. InvisibleSun 02:21, 19 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 00:18, 19 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Aphaia 10:40, 19 May 2008 (UTC)

I know of nothing more exciting than war. ~ Moshe Dayan

OR

War is the most exciting and dramatic thing in life. In fighting to the death you feel terribly relaxed when you manage to come through. ~ Moshe Dayan

  • 2 and I agree with Dayan here. The amount of excitement is unparalleled, regardless of all the horrid pain and suffering, it is true that war is never ever dull. Zarbon 04:56, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 0 This is an Unsourced quote. InvisibleSun 06:19, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
    • SOURCE: The Book of Military Quotations - Peter G. Tsouras - Reference - 2005 - Page 477
    • Comment: Now it is sourced so you can repeat your vote. Zarbon 21:37, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
  • Then it's a 2 for the second version. InvisibleSun 02:21, 19 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 00:18, 19 May 2008 (UTC)

To saunter is to enjoy life; it is to indulge the flight of fancy; it is to enjoy the sublime pictures of misery, of love, of joy, of gracious or grotesque physiognomies; it is to pierce with a glance the abysses of a thousand existences; for the young it is to desire all, and to possess all; for the old it is to live the life of the youthful, and to share their passions. ~ Honoré de Balzac


Love makes us almost sacred in our own eyes; it is the life of another that we revere within us; then and so begins for us the cruelest trouble of all. ~ Honoré de Balzac

I do like this one, but it is only a borderline 3 for me, and I actually would prefer that it be extended. ~ Kalki 00:00, 20 May 2008 (UTC)

Our heart is a treasury; if you pour out all its wealth at once, you are bankrupt. We show no more mercy to the affection that reveals its utmost extent than we do to another kind of prodigal who has not a penny left. ~ Honoré de Balzac


Kindness is not without its rocks ahead. People are apt to put it down to an easy temper and seldom recognize it as the secret striving of a generous nature; whilst, on the other hand, the ill-natured get credit for all the evil they refrain from. ~ Honoré de Balzac


Love has its own instinct, finding the way to the heart, as the feeblest insect finds the way to its flower, with a will which nothing can dismay nor turn aside. ~ Honoré de Balzac


2004
The road to wisdom? — Well, it's plain and simple to express: Err and err and err again but less and less and less. ~ Piet Hein
2005
May the Force be with you. ~ Jedi saying; used in all Star Wars episodes.
2006
A man should never be ashamed to own he has been in the wrong, which is but saying, in other words, that he is wiser today than he was yesterday. ~ Alexander Pope (born 21 May 1688)
2007
Life — a culmination of the past, an awareness of the present, an indication of a future beyond knowledge, the quality that gives a touch of divinity to matter. ~ Charles Lindbergh (80th anniversary of his solo flight across the Atlantic.)
2008
The flying Rumours gather'd as they roll'd,
Scarce any Tale was sooner heard than told;
And all who told it, added something new,
And all who heard it, made Enlargements too,
In ev'ry Ear it spread, on ev'ry Tongue it grew.

~ Alexander Pope ~
2009

Suggestions

Some Figures monstrous and mis-shap'd appear,
Consider'd singly, or beheld too near,
Which, but proportion'd to their Light, or Place,
Due Distance reconciles to Form and Grace.
A prudent Chief not always must display
His Pow'rs in equal Ranks, and fair Array,
But with th' Occasion and the Place comply,
Conceal his Force, nay seem sometimes to Fly.
Those oft are Stratagems which Errors seem,
Nor is it Homer Nods, but We that Dream.

~ Alexander Pope ~


Trust not your self; but your Defects to know,
Make use of ev'ry Friend — and ev'ry Foe.

~ Alexander Pope ~


All seems Infected that th' Infected spy,
As all looks yellow to the Jaundic'd Eye.

~ Alexander Pope ~


The environment of human life has changed more rapidly and more extensively in recent years than it has ever changed before. When environment changes, there must be a corresponding change in life. That change must be so great that it is not likely to be completed in a decade or in a generation. ~ Charles Lindbergh (Anniversary of the completion of his solo flight across the Atlantic.)


2004
The way I see it, if you want the rainbow you gotta be willing to put up with the rain. ~ Dolly Parton
2005
The highest morality may prove also to be the highest wisdom when the half-told story comes to be finished. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle (born 22 May 1859)
2006
A little Learning is a dang'rous Thing;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian Spring:
There shallow Draughts intoxicate the Brain,
And drinking largely sobers us again.

~ Alexander Pope (The date of Pope's birth was not definite when this was proposed for QOTD; he is said to have been born 22 May 1688, in The Life of Pope (1781) by Samuel Johnson, but apparently this was an error, for 21 May seems to have become the most widely accepted date.)
2007
I should dearly love that the world should be ever so little better for my presence. Even on this small stage we have our two sides, and something might be done by throwing all one's weight on the scale of breadth, tolerance, charity, temperance, peace, and kindliness to man and beast. We can't all strike very big blows, and even the little ones count for something. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle
2008
Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself; but talent instantly recognizes genius. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle
2009

Suggestions

The more we progress the more we tend to progress. We advance not in arithmetical but in geometrical progression. We draw compound interest on the whole capital of knowledge and virtue which has been accumulated since the dawning of time. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle


Life is infinitely stranger than anything which the mind of man could invent. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle



2004
I try to make everyone's day a little more surreal. ~ Bill Watterson
2005
It seems that it is madder never to abandon one's self than often to be infatuated; better to be wounded, a captive and a slave, than always to walk in armor. ~ Margaret Fuller (born 23 May 1810)
2006
Cynicism isn't smarter, it's only safer. There's nothing fluffy about optimism. ~ Jewel (born 23 May 1974)
2007
What I mean by the Muse is that unimpeded clearness of the intuitive powers, which a perfectly truthful adherence to every admonition of the higher instincts would bring to a finely organized human being. It may appear as prophecy or as poesy. ... should these faculties have free play, I believe they will open new, deeper and purer sources of joyous inspiration than have as yet refreshed the earth. ~ Margaret Fuller
2008
Genius will live and thrive without training, but it does not the less reward the watering–pot and pruning–knife. ~ Margaret Fuller (born May 23)
2009

Suggestions

After the deed is done, one always becomes clever and philosophical. ~ Hans Frank (born May 23)

  • 3 because one realizes after it is too late. Irony and moral go together, especially when learning too late. Zarbon 04:24, 18 April 2008 (UTC)
    • SOURCE: The Nuremberg Interviews by Leon Goldensohn, Robert Gellately - History - 2004 - Page 29
  • 2 InvisibleSun 22:17, 22 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 22:55, 22 May 2008 (UTC)

Time always has some reconciling effect. On every ruin there eventually grows grass, and then some shrubbery, and finally, before you realize it, what is really an old hideous ruin becomes a romantic sight and legend. ~ Hans Frank (born May 23)

  • 4 because time mends and heals, and even in the worst case scenario, under the worst conditions, a positive outlook can be seen. And I am giving this a 4 for this year. Zarbon 04:21, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
    • SOURCE: The Nuremberg Interviews by Leon Goldensohn, Robert Gellately - History - 2004 - Page 36
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:17, 22 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 22:55, 22 May 2008 (UTC)

Let no one dare to call another mad who is not himself willing to rank in the same class for every perversion and fault of judgment. Let no one dare aid in punishing another as criminal who is not willing to suffer the penalty due to his own offenses. ~ Margaret Fuller (born May 23)

  • 2 because judgment on others calls for judgment on yourself. Zarbon 16:43, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 4 InvisibleSun 22:17, 22 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 22:55, 22 May 2008 (UTC)

Plants of great vigor will almost always struggle into blossom, despite impediments. But there should be encouragement, and a free genial atmosphere for those of more timid sort, fair play for each in its own kind. ~ Margaret Fuller


Always the soul says to us all, Cherish your best hopes as a faith, and abide by them in action. Such shall be the effectual fervent means to their fulfilment. ~ Margaret Fuller


2004 
The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves. ~ Carl Jung
2005 
I think of a hero as someone who understands the degree of responsibility that comes with his freedom. ~ Bob Dylan (born 24 May 1941)
2006 
Every failure is a step to success. ~ William Whewell (born 24 May 1794)
2007
Freedom of expression is the matrix, the indispensable condition, of nearly every other form of freedom. ~ Benjamin N. Cardozo (born 24 May 1870)
2008
Every failure is a step to success. Every detection of what is false directs us towards what is true: every trial exhausts some tempting form of error. ~ William Whewell
  • proposed by Kalki (proposed and chosen without recognition that part of it had been used in 2006)
2009

Suggestions

Our course of advance... is neither a straight line nor a curve. It is a series of dots and dashes. ~ Benjamin N. Cardozo (date of birth)

  • 3 Kalki 00:04, 24 May 2006 (UTC)
  • 3 Herby talk thyme 13:54, 18 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 because life is filled with difficulties, it is never simplistic and the comparison is well seen here. Zarbon 05:34, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:31, 23 May 2008 (UTC)

Man is the interpreter of nature, science the right interpretation. ~ William Whewell (born May 24)

  • 3 because science is a deciphered truth, based on fact and fact alone. Misinterpretation has never played a role in the scientific defense, even when man has interpreted as such from nature itself. Zarbon 05:34, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 19:23, 23 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:31, 23 May 2008 (UTC)

Magic words and incantations are as fatal to our science as they are to any other. Methods, when classified and separated, acquire their true bearing and perspective as a means to an end, not as ends in themselves. We seek to find peace of mind in the word, the formula, the ritual. The hope is illusion. ~ Benjamin N. Cardozo (born May 24)

  • 3 because the hope alone will not solve the puzzle, the enigma. In order to find the pathway within the labyrinth of formula, one must first understand how magic has never been a solid status of word or ritual. Zarbon 05:34, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 19:23, 23 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:31, 23 May 2008 (UTC)

If a nation does not want a monarchy, change the nation's mind. If a nation does not need a monarchy, change the nation's needs. ~ Jan Smuts (born May 24)

  • 3 because the needs and wants of man can be changed. Zarbon 05:33, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 19:23, 23 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 InvisibleSun 22:31, 23 May 2008 (UTC)

The emotional appeal of nature is tremendous, sometimes almost more than one can bear. ~ Jan Smuts (born May 24)

  • 2 because the effects of nature on one can be irreperable. Zarbon 05:33, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 but would extend this to "The intimate rapport with nature is one of the most precious things in life. Nature is indeed very close to us; sometimes closer than hands and feet, of which in truth she is but the extension. The emotional appeal of nature is tremendous, sometimes almost more than one can bear."
  • 3 For the extended quotation. - InvisibleSun 22:31, 23 May 2008 (UTC)

It is the army that finally makes a citizen of you; without it you still have a chance, however slim, to remain a human being. ~ Joseph Brodsky


The formula for prison is a lack of space counterbalanced by a surplus of time. ~ Joseph Brodsky


Five or six hundred [aristocratic] heads lopped off would have assured you repose and happiness; a false humanity has restrained your arm and suspended your blows; it will cost the lives of millions of your brothers. ~ Jean-Paul Marat


We may try to see things as objectively as we please. None the less, we can never see them with any eyes except our own. ~ Benjamin N. Cardozo


No force however great can stretch a cord however fine into an horizontal line which is accurately straight. ~ William Whewell

  • 2 Kalki 19:23, 23 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 I remember seeing this quotation, beginning "Hence no force," etc., cited in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations as "an example of accidental rhyme and metre." In Bartlett's the quotation begins with "And so no force," etc. It might be better to restore the original phrasing, whichever it might be, so as to emphasize, by the cadence of the words, the serendipity of this rhymed-and-metered prose. - InvisibleSun 22:31, 23 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 00:08, 24 May 2008 (UTC)

How many roads must a man walk down
Before you call him a man?
Yes, 'n' how many seas must a white dove sail
Before she sleeps in the sand?
Yes, 'n' how many times must the cannon balls fly
Before they're forever banned?
The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind,
The answer is blowin' in the wind.

~ Bob Dylan ~


How many times must a man look up
Before he can see the sky?
Yes, 'n' how many ears must one man have
Before he can hear people cry?
Yes, 'n' how many deaths will it take till he knows
That too many people have died?
The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind,
The answer is blowin' in the wind.

~ Bob Dylan ~



2004
I got some new underwear the other day. Well, new to me. ~ Emo Philips
2005
If the stars should appear one night in a thousand years, how would men believe and adore; and preserve for many generations the remembrance of the city of God which had been shown! But every night come out these envoys of beauty, and light the universe with their admonishing smile. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson (born 25 May 1803)
2006
They reckon ill who leave me out;
When me they fly, I am the wings;
I am the doubter and the doubt,
And I the hymn the Brahmin sings.

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson (born 25 May 1803)
2007
Is pain a promise? I was schooled in pain,
And found out what I could of all desire;
I weep for what I'm like when I'm alone
In the deep center of the voice and fire.

I know the motion of the deepest stone.
Each one's himself, yet each one's everyone.

~ Theodore Roethke ~

2008
Any man who can hitch the length and breadth of the galaxy, rough it, slum it, struggle against terrible odds, win through, and still knows where his towel is, is clearly a man to be reckoned with. ~ Douglas Adams in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. May 25th is Towel Day
2009

Suggestions

Remember, the Force will be with you, always. ~ Obi-Wan Kenobi, Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, released on May 25, 1977.

  • 3 Aphaia 23:43, 12 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 ~ Kalki 06:31, 24 May 2007 (UTC) (but a variant of this has already been used
    • 2 I changed my vote to avoid feeling of duplication. --Aphaia 10:10, 24 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 10:04, 24 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Herby talk thyme 14:13, 24 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 If only it were as compelling as something Darth Sidious said in Episode III Zarbon 05:39, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Lyle 14:45, 21 November 2008 (UTC)

Death was not. I lived in a simple drowse:
Hands and hair moved through a dream of wakening blossoms.
Rain sweetened the cave and the dove still called;
The flowers leaned on themselves, the flowers in hollows;
And love, love sang toward.
~ Theodore Roethke (born May 25, 1908)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 10:04, 24 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Aphaia 10:10, 24 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 22:52, 24 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:39, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Lyle 14:45, 21 November 2008 (UTC)

  • I'll seek my own meekness.
    What grace I have is enough.
    The lost have their own pace.
    The stalks ask something else.
    What the grave says,
    The nest denies.
    ~ Theodore Roethke
  • 3 InvisibleSun 10:04, 24 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Aphaia 10:10, 24 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Herby talk thyme 14:13, 24 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 22:52, 24 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:39, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

The moon draws back its waters from the shore.
By the lake's edge, I see a silver swan,
And she is what I would. In this light air,
Lost opposites bend down —
Sing of that nothing of which all is made,
Or listen into silence, like a god.

~ Theodore Roethke


I have gone into the waste lonely places
Behind the eye.
~ Theodore Roethke


God bless the roots! — Body and soul are one!
The small become the great, the great the small;
The right thing happens to the happy man.
~ Theodore Roethke


I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.
I feel my fate in what I cannot fear.
I learn by going where I have to go.

~ Theodore Roethke ~

  • 4 Kalki 22:52, 24 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:39, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Lyle 14:45, 21 November 2008 (UTC)

Try not. Do, or do not, there is no try. ~Master Yoda, as played by Frank Oz (born May 25, 1944) Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back

  • 4 Lyle 14:45, 21 November 2008 (UTC)
  • 0 this was already used on October 17, 2004. Zarbon 05:02, 22 November 2008 (UTC)


2004
Everything that is new or uncommon raises a pleasure in the imagination, because it fills the soul with an agreeable surprise, gratifies its curiosity, and gives it an idea of which it was not before possessed. ~ Joseph Addison
2005
It is a wholesome and necessary thing for us to turn again to the earth and in the contemplation of her beauties to know of wonder and humility. ~ Rachel Carson
2006
When you get in situations where you cannot afford to make a mistake, it's very hard to do the right thing. So if you're trying to do the right thing, the right thing might be to eliminate the cost of making a mistake rather than try to guess what's right. ~ Ward Cunningham (born 26 May 1949)
2007
I'm not a fan of classification. It's very difficult to come up with a classification scheme that's useful when what you're most interested in is things that don't fit in, things that you didn't expect. ~ Ward Cunningham
2008
Thunder only happens when it's raining.
Players only love you when they're playing.
Say... Women... they will come and they will go.
When the rain washes you clean... you'll know.

~ Stevie Nicks ~
2009

Suggestions

Over and over, people try to design systems that make tomorrow's work easy. But when tomorrow comes it turns out they didn't quite understand tomorrow's work, and they actually made it harder. ~ Ward Cunningham


You have so many things in the background that you're supposed to do, there's no room left to think. I say, forget all that and ask yourself, "What's the simplest thing that could possibly work?" ~ Ward Cunningham


Charming to the last. You don't know how hard I found it, signing the order to terminate your life. ~ from Star Wars Grand Moff Tarkin Peter Cushing (born May 26)

  • 3 always strongly loved Tarkin and truly, charming to the last. Zarbon 06:06, 24 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 22:15, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

Evacuate? In our moment of triumph? I think you overestimate their chances. ~ from Star Wars Grand Moff Tarkin Peter Cushing (born May 26)

  • 3 Zarbon 06:06, 24 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 22:15, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

Why is it the Mongols of this world always tell us they're defending us against the Mongols? ~ Edward Whittemore (born May 26)

  • 3 because those who say they protect actually do the opposite more than often. Zarbon 05:49, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 22:15, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

I've seen so goddamn much — I've seen so much that there's no reasonable excuse for looking away, because there can't be anything left that's more terrible than what has come before. ~ Caitlín R. Kiernan (born May 26)

  • 3 because to admit to witnessing all which the past has to offer is to accept what the future yet holds. Zarbon 05:49, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 22:15, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

If there must be resolution and explanation, it must be something worth its weight in mystery. Most times, I'd be content with the mystery. ~ Caitlín R. Kiernan (born May 26)

  • 3 because sometimes the truth can hurt more than the mystery. Nice one. Zarbon 05:49, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 22:15, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

When you have nothing left to burn, you must set yourself on fire. ~ Dr. Jack Kevorkian (born May 26)

  • 3 because someone who festers and corrupts everything around eventually has no one left to burn but himself, from the built-up anguish and torment that created the heavy burden. This holds a very powerful, enigmatic meaning. Zarbon 22:07, 26 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 22:15, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

First of all, do any of you here think it's a crime to help a suffering human end his agony? ~ Dr. Jack Kevorkian (born May 26)

  • 3 because helping end another's suffering has always been looked at from two different angles, either for it or against it. It brings a very powerful and controversial moral into play. Zarbon 22:07, 26 April 2008 (UTC)
    • Source: FRONTLINE Show #1416 - Air Date: May 14, 1996 on PBS
  • 1 Kalki 22:15, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

I failed in securing my options for this choice for myself, but I succeeded in verifying the Dark Age is still with us. ~ Dr. Jack Kevorkian (born May 26)

  • 3 because some fundamental laws are truly flawed in essence, whereas this quote truly brings a moral comparison between the Dark Ages and the governments of today. Zarbon 22:07, 26 April 2008 (UTC)
    • Source: Western Herald - Apr 12, 2004
  • 2 Kalki 22:15, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

I will admit, like Socrates and Aristotle and Plato and some other philosophers, that there are instances where the death penalty would seem appropriate. ~ Dr. Jack Kevorkian (born May 26)

  • 3 because as the great philosophers themselves had stated, sometimes death is the only way out. Zarbon 22:07, 26 April 2008 (UTC)
    • Source: Years of Minutes - Page 332 - by Andy Rooney - Performing Arts - 2004
  • 1 Kalki 22:15, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

When history looks back, it will prove what I'll die knowing. ~ Dr. Jack Kevorkian (born May 26)

  • 3 because it takes a long time for mankind to understand some things, sometimes hundreds if not thousands of years. But the ability to acknowledge knowing this prior and dying with this knowledge is admirable. Zarbon 22:07, 26 April 2008 (UTC)
    • Source: Between the Dying and the Dead: Dr. Jack Kevorkian's Life and the Battle to Legalize Euthanasia. - Page 247 - by Neal Nicol, Harry Wylie - Biography & Autobiography - 2006
  • 1 Kalki 22:15, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

You're going to watch a person suffer in agony while somebody's debating? ~ Dr. Jack Kevorkian (born May 26)

  • 3 because sometimes one person's suffering is horrid, even when law finds it alright. Zarbon 22:07, 26 April 2008 (UTC)
    • Source: Physician-assisted Death - Page 100 - by James M. Humber, Robert F. Almeder, Gregg A. Kasting - Psychology - 1994
  • 1 Kalki 22:15, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

The sword is our steel Bible! ~ Sadao Araki

  • 4 Zarbon 16:56, 24 June 2008 (UTC)


2004
All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer
2005
The strokes of the pen need deliberation as much as the sword needs swiftness. ~ Julia Ward Howe (born 27 May 1819)
2006
Don't start an argument with somebody who has a microphone when you don't. They'll make you look like chopped liver. ~ Harlan Ellison (born 27 May 27 1934)
2007
Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord:
He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored;
He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword:
His truth is marching on.

~ Julia Ward Howe ~
2008
Like the wind crying endlessly through the universe, Time carries away the names and the deeds of conquerors and commoners alike. And all that we are, all that remains, is in the memories of those who cared we came this way for a brief moment. ~ Harlan Ellison
2009

Suggestions

This is a test. Take notes. This will count as 3/4 of your final grade. Hints: remember, in chess, kings cancel each other out and cannot occupy adjacent squares, are therefore all-powerful and totally powerless, cannot affect each other, produce stalemate. Hinduism is a polytheistic religion; the sect of Atman worships the divine spark of life within Man; in effect saying, "Thou art God." Provisos of equal time are not served by one viewpoint having media access to two hundred million people in prime time while opposing viewpoints are provided with a soapbox on the corner. Not everyone tells the truth. ~ Harlan Ellison

  • 3 Kalki 00:11, 27 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:42, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

My philosophy of life is that the meek shall inherit nothing but debasement, frustration and ignoble deaths; that there is security in personal strength; that you can fight City Hall and win; that any action is better than no action, even if it's the wrong action; that you never reach glory or self-fulfillment unless you're willing to risk everything, dare anything, put yourself dead on the line every time; and that once one becomes strong or rich or potent or powerful it is the responsibility of the strong to help the weak become strong. ~ Harlan Ellison

  • 3 Kalki 00:11, 27 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:42, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

I am anti-entropy. My work is foursquare for chaos. I spend my life personally, and my work professionally, keeping the soup boiling. Gadfly is what they call you when you are no longer dangerous; I much prefer troublemaker, malcontent, desperado. I see myself as a combination of Zorro and Jiminy Cricket. My stories go out from here and raise hell. From time to time some denigrator or critic with umbrage will say of my work, "He only wrote that to shock." I smile and nod. Precisely. ~ Harlan Ellison

  • 3 Kalki 00:11, 27 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:42, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

Power is the ultimate aphrodisiac. ~ Henry Kissinger (born May 27)

  • 2 Zarbon 06:00, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 16:40, 26 May 2008 (UTC)

Blessed are the people whose leaders can look destiny in the eye without flinching but also without attempting to play God. ~ Henry Kissinger

  • 2 but although the people be blessed, the leader is less dynamic when this course of action be taken. I myself prefer leaders who like to "play God" but this is still a nice quote. Zarbon 06:00, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:40, 26 May 2008 (UTC)

Ninety percent of the politicians give the other ten percent a bad reputation. ~ Henry Kissinger

  • 2 because this quote, although targeting politicians negatively, is rather well sounding. Zarbon 06:00, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:40, 26 May 2008 (UTC)

There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full. ~ Henry Kissinger

  • 3 as if the crisis would wait for people's comfort. Nice, comedic in a way. Zarbon 06:00, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 16:40, 26 May 2008 (UTC)

Behind all music we ought to try and catch that noiseless tone thats made for us, the melody of death. ~ Louis-Ferdinand Céline (born May 27)

  • 2 Zarbon 06:11, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 16:40, 26 May 2008 (UTC)

Fate towers so high above us, the squall carries us off like fleas in the water. ~ Louis-Ferdinand Céline (born May 27)

  • 3 because I love all sayings dealing with the inescapability of fate, also the inevitable fate, that which is portrayed in Greek tragedy, one of my favorite ideological perspectives. Zarbon 06:11, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 16:40, 26 May 2008 (UTC)

The conscience of an artist worthy of the name is like an incurable disease which causes him endless torment but occasionally fills him with silent joy... ~ Georges Rouault

  • 3 Zarbon 04:23, 22 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:40, 26 May 2008 (UTC)

The more clearly we can focus our attention on the wonders and realities of the universe about us, the less taste we shall have for destruction. ~ Rachel Carson

  • 3 Zarbon 04:23, 22 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:40, 26 May 2008 (UTC)

I am confirmed in my division of human energies. Ambitious people climb, but faithful people build. ~ Julia Ward Howe

  • 3 Zarbon 04:23, 22 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 16:40, 26 May 2008 (UTC)


2004
Transport of the mails, transport of the human voice, transport of flickering pictures — in this century, as in others, our highest accomplishments still have the single aim of bringing men together. ~ Antoine de Saint-Exupery
2005
We have gotten some terrible reviews at times but if we depended on the judgment of the studios or critics, we never would have made more than one movie. ~ Ismail Merchant (recent death)
2006
What I do know for certain is that what is regarded as success in a rational materialistic society only impresses superficial minds. It amounts to nothing and will not help us rout the destructive forces threatening us today. What may be our salvation is the discovery of the identity hidden deep in any one of us, and which may be found in even the most desperate individual, if he cares to search the spiritual womb which contains the embryo of what can be one's personal contribution to truth and life. ~ Patrick White (born 28 May 1912)
2007
I have the same idea with all my books: an attempt to come close to the core of reality, the structure of reality, as opposed to the merely superficial. The realistic novel is remote from art. A novel should heighten life, should give one an illuminating experience; it shouldn't set out what you know already. I just muddle away at it. One gets flashes here and there, which help. I am not a philosopher or an intellectual. Practically anything I have done of any worth I feel I have done through my intuition, not my mind... ~ Patrick White
2008
In my books I have lifted bits from various religions in trying to come to a better understanding; I've made use of religious themes and symbols. Now, as the world becomes more pagan, one has to lead people in the same direction in a different way... ~ Patrick White
2009

Suggestions

I'm iron. I lasted through ten years of war, and now I can last through this. It's true, it's not good for the nerves. ~ Sepp Dietrich (born May 28)

  • 3 because one would have to be steel to withstand many hardships. Zarbon 04:20, 18 April 2008 (UTC)
    • SOURCE: The Nuremberg Interviews by Leon Goldensohn, Robert Gellately - History - 2004 - Page 280
  • 1 What is being referred to by "this"? - InvisibleSun 17:42, 27 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 22:34, 27 May 2008 (UTC)

Conversation is imperative if gaps are to be filled, and old age, it is the last gap but one. ~ Patrick White

  • 3 but alas, old age is welcomed. Zarbon 16:52, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 17:42, 27 May 2008 (UTC)

The essence of what you have to say you pick up before you're twenty... ~ Patrick White

  • 3 because the perspective and understanding of one is formulated prior to that age. It would be rather difficult to change one's view after this age, dogmatism has become a standard of living, especially for this century. Zarbon 16:52, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 17:42, 27 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 22:34, 27 May 2008 (UTC)

Now there is no taboo; everything is allowed. But one cannot simply go back to tonality, it’s not the way. We must find a way of neither going back nor continuing the avant-garde. I am in a prison: one wall is the avant-garde, the other wall is the past, and I want to escape. ~ György Ligeti (born May 28)

  • 3 because when both the past and future fail to answer, one is deadlocked. Nice. I love these scenarios. Zarbon 06:18, 17 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 17:42, 27 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 22:34, 27 May 2008 (UTC)

Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves. ~ William Pitt the Younger


I have discovered that most people have no one to talk to, no one, that is, who really wants to listen. When it does at last dawn on a man that you really want to hear about his business, the look that comes over his face is something to see. ~ Walker Percy (born May 28, 1916)


Why is there such a gap between nonspeaking animals and speaking man, when there is no other such gap in nature?

Is it possible that a theory of man is nothing more nor less than a theory of the speaking creatures? ~ Walker Percy

  • 4 InvisibleSun 18:28, 27 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 because man holds intellect, experience, and knowledge to differ from the rest of nature. Even if I were to agree with the quote, which I don't, I would never say that the theory of animals holds prevalence to the theory of man, as barbaric as man may be. Greek philosophy is still strong because it taught mankind the major difference between the rest of the animal kingdom and the intellect of man. I don't want to disagree with InvisibleSun too much, because I do agree with him for many suggestions, but this one here I think I can't agree with the ideology behind. Zarbon 21:27, 27 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 22:34, 27 May 2008 (UTC)

Why is it that one can look at a lion or a planet or an owl or at someone’s finger as long as one pleases, but looking into the eyes of another person is, if prolonged past a second, a perilous affair? ~ Walker Percy


The time has come when scientific truth must cease to be the property of the few, when it must be woven into the common life of the world. ~ Louis Agassiz (born May 28, 1807)


Men want a woman whom they can turn on and off like a light switch. ~ Ian Fleming (born May 28, 1908)


The time has come when scientific truth must cease to be the property of the few, when it must be woven into the common life of the world. ~ Louis Agassiz

  • 3 Fossil 22:17, 7 November 2008 (UTC)

The eye of the trilobite tells us that the sun shone on the old beach where he lived; for there is nothing in nature without a purpose, and when so complicated an organ was made to receive light, there must have been light to enter it. ~ Louis Agassiz

  • 3 Fossil 22:17, 7 November 2008 (UTC)

The facts will eventually test all our theories, and they form, after all, the only impartial jury to which we can appeal. ~ Louis Agassiz

  • 4 Fossil 22:17, 7 November 2008 (UTC)


2004
A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. ~ Steven Wright
2005
Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting. Learning is the only thing for you. Look what a lot of things there are to learn. ~ T. H. White (born 29 May 1906)
2006
It is idle to talk always of the alternative of reason and faith. Reason is itself a matter of faith. It is an act of faith to assert that our thoughts have any relation to reality at all. ~ G. K. Chesterton (born 29 May 1874)
2007
The pessimist is commonly spoken of as the man in revolt. He is not. Firstly, because it requires some cheerfulness to continue in revolt, and secondly, because pessimism appeals to the weaker side of everybody, and the pessimist, therefore, drives as roaring a trade as the publican. The person who is really in revolt is the optimist, who generally lives and dies in a desperate and suicidal effort to persuade all the other people how good they are. It has been proved a hundred times over that if you really wish to enrage people and make them angry, even unto death, the right way to do it is to tell them that they are all the sons of God. ~ G. K. Chesterton
2008
Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable. ~ John F. Kennedy
2009

Suggestions

For fear of the newspapers politicians are dull, and at last they are too dull even for the newspapers. - G. K. Chesterton


Moderate strength is shown in violence, supreme strength is shown in levity. - G. K. Chesterton


Men do not differ much about what things they will call evils; they differ enormously about what evils they will call excusable. - G. K. Chesterton


The most unfathomable schools and sages have never attained to the gravity which dwells in the eyes of a baby of three months old. It is the gravity of astonishment at the universe, and astonishment at the universe is not mysticism, but a transcendent common-sense. The fascination of children lies in this: that with each of them all things are remade, and the universe is put again upon its trial. ~ G. K. Chesterton


I have investigated the dust-heaps of humanity, and found a treasure in all of them. I have found that humanity is not incidentally engaged, but eternally and systematically engaged, in throwing gold into the gutter and diamonds into the sea. ~ G. K. Chesterton


Religious and philosophical beliefs are, indeed, as dangerous as fire, and nothing can take from them that beauty of danger. But there is only one way of really guarding ourselves against the excessive danger of them, and that is to be steeped in philosophy and soaked in religion. ~ G. K. Chesterton


When I was a child, I was told anyone can become president. Now, I'm starting to believe it. (Found on a "Good Earth" tea bag)

—This unsigned comment is by 198.236.184.8 (talkcontribs) .
  • 2 Kalki 06:26, 5 June 2007 (UTC) Interesting quote, but no clear author, and no clear relationship to the date.
  • 3 but I wonder who said it Zarbon 05:46, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 0 Unless source found. InvisibleSun 21:35, 28 May 2008 (UTC)

One day the last portrait of Rembrandt and the last bar of Mozart will have ceased to be — though possibly a colored canvas and a sheet of notes will remain — because the last eye and the last ear accessible to their message will have gone. ~ Oswald Spengler


This is our purpose: to make as meaningful as possible this life that has been bestowed upon us; to live in such a way that we may be proud of ourselves; to act in such a way that some part of us lives on. ~ Oswald Spengler


A man does what he must — in spite of personal consequences, in spite of obstacles and dangers, and pressures — and that is the basis of all human morality. ~ John F. Kennedy


The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie — deliberate, contrived and dishonest — but the myth — persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. ~ John F. Kennedy


Dante once said that the hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in a period of moral crisis, maintain their neutrality. ~ John F. Kennedy


Freedom is indivisible, and when one man is enslaved, all are not free. ~ John F. Kennedy


Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate. ~ John F. Kennedy


If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. ~ John F. Kennedy


Mankind must put an end to war or war will put an end to mankind. ~ John F. Kennedy

  • 2 Zarbon 04:51, 22 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:35, 28 May 2008 (UTC)
  • This one was already used. (I will try to update this page more, fully listing JFK and GKC quotes used on other dates, within the next day or two) ~ Kalki 21:47, 28 May 2008 (UTC)


2004
All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream. ~ Edgar Allan Poe
2005
The liberty of man consists solely in this: that he obeys natural laws because he has himself recognized them as such, and not because they have been externally imposed upon him by any extrinsic will whatever, divine or human, collective or individual. ~ Mikhail Bakunin (born 30 May 1814)
2006
I bow before the authority of special men because it is imposed on me by my own reason. I am conscious of my own inability to grasp, in all its detail, and positive development, any very large portion of human knowledge. The greatest intelligence would not be equal to a comprehension of the whole... I receive and I give — such is human life. Each directs and is directed in his turn. Therefore there is no fixed and constant authority, but a continual exchange of mutual, temporary, and, above all, voluntary authority and subordination. ~ Mikhail Bakunin (born 30 May 1814)
2007
I myself am human and free only to the extent that I acknowledge the humanity and liberty of all my fellows... I am properly free when all the men and women about me are equally free. Far from being a limitation or a denial of my liberty, the liberty of another is its necessary condition and confirmation. ~ Mikhail Bakunin
2008
By striving to do the impossible, man has always achieved what is possible. ~ Mikhail Bakunin (born 30 May 1814)
2009

Suggestions

When the people are being beaten with a stick, they are not much happier if it is called "the People's Stick." ~ Mikhail Bakunin (born May 30)

  • 4 because a beating's a beating no matter what words are ascribed to it. Zarbon 05:50, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 22:12, 29 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:50, 29 May 2008 (UTC)

The first revolt is against the supreme tyranny of theology, of the phantom of God. As long as we have a master in heaven, we will be slaves on earth. ~ Mikhail Bakunin (born May 30)

  • 3 because, as the quote implies, the image of God has been used to enslave many people, instill heavy belief, and target religions against each other. This quote is very true, because more negative has come from religious fanaticism instead of positive. The belief in itself makes all living beings susceptible to feeling as if they are slaves to one master, the creator, so to speak. This image is well painted by Bakunin in this single quote, regardless of whether or not I agree with it. Zarbon 05:50, 29 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 22:12, 29 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:50, 29 May 2008 (UTC)

What all other men are is of the greatest importance to me. However independent I may imagine myself to be, however far removed I may appear from mundane considerations by my social status, I am enslaved to the misery of the meanest member of society. ~ Mikhail Bakunin


Even the most wretched individual of our present society could not exist and develop without the cumulative social efforts of countless generations. Thus the individual, his freedom and reason, are the products of society, and not vice versa: society is not the product of individuals comprising it; and the higher, the more fully the individual is developed, the greater his freedom — and the more he is the product of society, the more does he receive from society and the greater his debt to it. ~ Mikhail Bakunin


The freedom of all is essential to my freedom. ~ Mikhail Bakunin

  • 2 Zarbon 16:03, 29 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 22:12, 29 May 2008 (UTC) (though this might be a variant translation of a statement already used within a larger quote.)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:50, 29 May 2008 (UTC)

A person is strong only when he stands upon his own truth, when he speaks and acts from his deepest convictions. Then, whatever the situation he may be in, he always knows what he must say and do. He may fall, but he cannot bring shame upon himself or his causes. ~ Mikhail Bakunin


Everything will pass, and the world will perish, but the Ninth Symphony will remain. ~ Mikhail Bakunin


No one can want to destroy without having some idea, true or false, of the order of things that should, according to him or her, replace what presently exists. ~ Mikhail Bakunin


2004
There is nothing so pitiful as a young cynic because he has gone from knowing nothing to believing nothing. ~ Maya Angelou
2005
When there are no more memories of heroes and martyrs, And when all life and all the souls of men and women are discharged from any part of the earth, Then only shall liberty or the idea of liberty be discharged from that part of the earth, And the infidel come into full possession. ~ Walt Whitman in Leaves of Grass (born 31 May 1819)
2006
I am for those that have never been master'd,
For men and women whose tempers have never been master'd,
For those whom laws, theories, conventions, can never master.

~ Walt Whitman in Leaves of Grass (born 31 May 1819)
2007
Who makes much of a miracle?
As to me I know of nothing else but miracles ...
To me every hour of the light and dark is a miracle,
Every cubic inch of space is a miracle...

~ Walt Whitman in Leaves of Grass ~
2008
Be composed — be at ease with me — I am Walt Whitman, liberal and lusty as Nature,
Not till the sun excludes you do I exclude you,
Not till the waters refuse to glisten for you and the leaves to rustle for you, do my words refuse to glisten and rustle for you.

~ Walt Whitman in Leaves of Grass ~
2009

Suggestions

I never look a gift horse in the mouth, but I am not averse to looking an organisation in the motive. ~ Fred Allen, an American comedian (born 31 May, 1956)

—This unsigned comment is by Waluigi Twin (talkcontribs) .
  • 2 Kalki 17:44, 30 May 2007 (UTC) I must confess that there is not likely to be anyone I would favor more than Whitman on his birthday than there is anyone I would favor more than William Shakespeare on his, but if we were to use a Fred Allen quote eventually I would favor the one I suggest below.
  • 3 InvisibleSun 19:40, 30 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 05:47, 23 April 2008 (UTC)

A celebrity is a person who works hard all his life to become well known, then wears dark glasses to avoid being recognized. ~ Fred Allen

  • 2 Kalki 17:44, 30 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 19:40, 30 May 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 05:47, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Lyle 13:16, 27 May 2008 (UTC)



Ranking system:

4 : Excellent - should definitely be used. (Perhaps, at most, only one quote per day should be ranked thus by any user, as to avoid confusions.)
3 : Very Good - strong desire to see it used.
2 : Good - some desire to see it used.
1 : Acceptable - but with no particular desire to see it used.
0 : Not acceptable - not appropriate for use as a quote of the day.